Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 383 total)
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  • #5326
    Profile photo of camouflage762
    camouflage762
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    Without trying to make light of what we go through here in RSA, I do believe that we are perhaps one of the freest nations. Sounds incredible!

    Allow me to explain:
    If you keep your head down-be discrete (Ie do not attract the eye of Sauron/Big Brother) you are totally responsible for your own family welfare.

    Yes we pay exorbitant taxes, however do not expect anything back for it. The Goverment is unable to provide basic services such as security, education and healthcare. Once you realise that you are responsible for this it is almost like declaring a Unilateral Declaration of Independance of the Mind.

    Those who realise that they are responsible for themselves, knuckle down and get on with it. Yes paying the taxes is viewed as a form of “protection money” but its part of life.

    With all the power outages folks who can have been making alternate plans, installing generators etc. South Africans are becoming hardened to such events. In One week we had no power for one day, no water for two and municipal sewage oozing into our yard. Yet business must go on, and it did.

    With regard to the handing in of firearms: The story of the latest firearms control legislation (FCA 2000) is on litany of unintended consequences.

    Yes, the government through use of fear and intimidation browbeat law abiding folk into doing the unthinkable in the name of remaining law abiding.

    However, this has the effect of removing a large portion of Junk/obsolete firearms from folks. Yes a few precious collectibles ended up in the heap, but this was the exception. Folks now realise that they were co-erced and have started buying newer firearms, of better quality and capacity for selfdefence.

    The law also sets a series of legalistic hoops that one has to jump through in order to qualify for certain categories of firearms such as semi-automatic rifles etc.

    If you “jump” through these hoops (If you cannot, it means you cannot read ;-) then the cops are obliged by law to issue you with the licence. However it is not that simple in practice.

    Realising that they have cocked every thing up the police are now unilaterally changing the requirements to include additional documents etc. In effect they are making up the law as they go along. They also use the whole bureaucratic process to slow things down or simply lose applications. Add to this incompetent, unmotivated and untrained staff and it becomes a bit of a lottery. However patience and persistence does pay off.

    IMO the biggest threat to firearms ownership inSouth Africa is high cost of ammo and firearms as well as supply. It puts it way beyond the ordinary folk. (An AR platform can cost from R20000 and a type 56 AK is a bargain at R8000, Assume an exchange rate of 10-12 to $1) If the yanks could get ITAR rescinded things would go much better for us ;-)

    No one is going to come and fix our problems, we have to do it ourselves. In the mean time we all have to toughen up and get on with it.

    This is Africa, and it is not for sissies.

    #5371
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    With your day being our night it may take a while before you get a reply. I had a good giggle when I eventually climbed in bed 3 o’clock in the morning. I loved your reply Malgus. It gave me a very big smile. No offense taken. It is important for people to think and realize what governments are asking from them.
    Someone somewhere in the world decided it would be a good idea to make South Africa as “safe” as possible. – Leopard
    It is a known fact that there is less crime if citizens are armed and can defend themselves against criminals.
    We could also zoom out and look at the whole of South Africa with fewer weapons to defend themselves. Wouldn’t it be easier to attack?
    But on a lighter side – The other reason for me, having a giggle in bed. There is an old story about a young man who got thrown in jail for having done something wrong. One day he received a letter from his mother that ended with ‘If only you were here, I could have had a vegetable garden. I guess with getting old my back is not very useful anymore.’ He replied with a letter stating that he buried some weapons in the back garden. She could sell it and use the money to go see a doctor and by some food.
    The next letter he received from his mother. ‘My dear son. Hope everything is well. The vegetable garden is coming on so beautiful! Thank you for sending all those gentlemen to dig up the soil in the back garden. They really did such a thorough job. Hope to hear from you soon?’
    ***
    You really need to keep your head straight and keep working on what you need to do next to accomplish more. You cannot wait for things to get better. You need to make it better yourself.
    Stay positive; also believe that there are still a lot of good intelligent people in your world that can make things happen.

    #5378
    Profile photo of aussie mick
    aussie mick
    Survivalist
    member1

    Can’t work out how to set up a “prepper profile”….but have a tip that may help some people with security and food supplies….grow dragon fruit around your perimeter fences…a great source of food..from a cactus…makes a great security fence (thousands of thorns)…gets better every year…can be shaped and guided to grow in any direction you wish by tying and cutting…grows from cuttings…will survive with little water, as it is a desert plant…although…watering 2 or 3 times a week will give more fruit. This year,from 5 plants (3 years old)…I have picked over 400 fruit..at an average weight of 450 grams…fruits continuously for 6 months. Next year…will be picking fruit from over 60 plants. There are about 10 different varieties…can be used as a great food source for barter…I swap them for eggs…veges…bakery products…the list is endless. Teach your neighbours to do the same…give them cuttings..I even plant the cuttings for them…they will have their own..instead of relying on my goodwill…I have given away over 100 plants so far…teach others to be self sufficient. A security fence, a privacy barrier, a food source..that gets better every year. Can also be grown up free standing posts, stumps or trees. Google “dragon fruit”…Aussie Mick.

    #5768
    Profile photo of Big_Five
    Big_Five
    Survivalist
    member1

    I am also living and working in Johannesburg, South Africa.
    I have to concur everything Leopard has said about this beautiful country and the challenges we are facing on a daily basis.
    Its a way of life to have 6 foot walls with an extra 3 foot fencing on top of that. Having guard dogs outside and smaller ones inside. All windows MUST have burglar bars and private security and alarm system outside and inside the house. I have my firearm on me most of the time and a spare near my bedside.
    We only allowed 200 rounds per weapon which is nothing.
    Every time your dogs barks you have to get up and go check through the windows if there an intruder.
    South African weapon laws state that (I simplified it a bit) :
    – if an intruder jumps over your wall , you are not allowed to shoot . The reason is that he might just be looking for some water. It sound stupid I know.
    – if an intruder breach your second line of defense and enters your home you are still not allowed to shoot or attack the villain.
    – if the intruder is not armed with a gun you certainly not allowed to shoot.
    – if the intruder is armed you still not allowed to shoot.
    – basically you are only allowed to shoot if the intruder points a gun at you or runs toward you with a knife or some other weapon.

    So many legal, law abiding, tax paying citizens lost their lives because of fear of the law to defend themselves.
    So many men was arrested for protecting their property and families. Only to be locked up in jail to be gang raped by the racists and the police allows that to happen out of pure hatred.
    Dr Gregory Stanton of Genocide watch has put South Africa on level 6 (level 7 is the extermination, and level 8 is the denial stage).

    I lost family members through brutal farm murders. If you Google this you will find spine chilling photos. The government says its only robbery but you don’t disembowel or behead someone to rob them, you don’t torture old people and rape them to rob them, you don’t drown a young boy in boiling water to rob him.
    You don’t pick up a 3 year old girl with her hair and shoot her execution style to rob them.

    The black people of our country also go through the same issues. only difference is they have the guts to stand together and hunt the criminal down and execute him in public to make a point. Even the police are scared to go out to murders and shootings. They usually get to the crime scene an hour or more after.

    South Africa has lost more people in farm murders than America lost soldiers in the Iraq and Afghan wars combined. To be a South African farmer is the most dangerous profession in the world.

    But even through all this we still love our country and is proud to be South African even though we are all from European decent. Our forefather landed here in 1652 and found a stunning country rich all natural minerals.

    Hope this is not too morbit but just a reality check.

    – i

    #5824
    Darin Prentice
    Darin Prentice
    Survivalist
    member4

    leopard, thanks.
    i need a slap of reality sometimes, iv seen short periods of time like that, days…maybe a week. but i knew i was leaving and that was 20 years ago.. even then it doesnt compare to your post. harsh reality….
    if you find yourself in western canada the fish are always jumping and the coffee is always on, drop me a message.
    Darin

    Prepare, Preserve, Protect...

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    #6120
    Profile photo of higherview
    higherview
    Survivalist
    member2

    Leopard, South Africa is one of my favorite places on earth. It has been sad to watch as it has changed – for the worse in many respects. I live in a place where most people still don’t lock their doors and gun ownership is very high. I have traveled widely and have mentioned to friends that except for the USA and Canada most places where anyone in an above poverty situation will live in a compound of some sort. There will be walls, bars, wire or broken glass / bottles on top of the wall and often people live together in compounds for safety. I’d like to add that I have not visited Australia or New Zealand so can not speak about he situation in those places.

    I have had a number of friends in South Africa ask me if it would be a “Christian” thing to do to be armed for protection. I always answer in the affirmative and even point them to the wonderful work by South African Christian author Charl Van Wyk – “Shooting Back: The Right and Duty of Self-defense”.

    Things have changed in South Africa over the years, and may have changed greatly since my last visit. I understand there are different laws concerning gun ownership for those in the “Farmer” category, as opposed to non-farmers. If that truly is the case and I were there I would certainly consider doing what ever was necessary to get myself & family into the “farmer” class. Even if that meant joining a co-op with other so-called “farmers”. My experience in South Africa is that people are helpful and understand the threats and are willing to help one another in many ways.

    I have a friend who immigrated to South Africa with his family from Zimbabwe when things became intolerable there. He was stabbed in the face by a man with a screw driver who was trying to steal his car parked on his own car-port. This was in a walled compound and he surprised two would-be car thieves and – while saving the car, had lots of reconstructive surgery to look forward to. He and his family now live in Florida, and to my knowledge have been safe since moving there. I have another friend who was a child when she and her family lived in South Africa. She told me that on five different occasions their home was broken into at night and her father had to use his handgun to save the family. She is totally convinced that the family would not be alive and healthy today without that hand gun and her fathers willingness to use it. The family all live in Australia today.

    I’m sure I will visit South Africa again. On my last visit I carried a legal hand gun, and probably will do so in the future. I feel for anyone in your situation Leopard. I should think one of the hardest things is having to make a choice for life and safety when you also have a strong sense of love for your country and the life you have known. The choices we are presented are not always easy.

    #6209
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Camourflage762, Bigfive .. anybody visiting Jhb between 13 to 15 May. Remember IFSEC South Africa at Gallagher in Midrand. I would like to go – want to know more about drones. (Military Distributer Southern Africa UAV and Drone systems with Night Vision capability Mobile trailer and Vehicle surveillance systems)

    #6219
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    I love your photo, Darin. I can sit on a big rock in the middle of a river for hours. Listening to the water, looking at little insects. Really need to do it more often…

    Higherview. .. I know farmers need to sometimes put down animals that suffer. I think the licencing department would rather give you approval for a firearm to put animals down than for self defense. I will have another look at the laws.

    I’ve got family and friends in Australia and New Zealand. They’ve left South Africa, been in floods and earthquakes and are still happy. No walls or burglar bars where they are staying.

    I would say that you do need to think about how you would react if someone or a group of individuals threaten to hurt your children or you or people that you do not even know. Every situation will be different. It might be best to simply try and get out of a bad situation.
    A few years ago I spoke to a black employee about this topic. Will I be able to kill another human being? He looked at me and said. “He is attacking you in your space. If he kills you, who is going to look after your child? He will come just to take your breath.” Meaning, he will kill you and walk away without stealing anything, not food or your vehicle. Just come take your life.

    #6233
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Will I be able to kill another human being? — :Leopard

    You will do what you must when the time comes.. someone told me a long time ago that the first one is expensive, but the rest are free. He was right.

    Some guys I know agonized over having to kill another human being. Some acted like it was taking out the trash. I was one of those who agonized over it. I finally figured it was either them or me, and then I screwed that feeling way down where it wouldn’t bother me… after that it was just, nothing… you do what you have to do.

    After I separated from the military, some 10 years later, I took my boy hunting with me. We shot two deer. Walking up on them, one was still alive and breathing. She didn’t have long, but I felt a deep sorrow… I took my sidearm, put it behind her ear and then I apologized to her. Told her I was sorry, but my family had to eat and I thanked her for her sacrifice… and then I put her down.

    When the time comes, you will do what you need to do.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #6265
    Profile photo of Big_Five
    Big_Five
    Survivalist
    member1

    Malgus your are spot on. People will have to do stuff to survive and our natural instinct will kick in.
    I have learned so much from all the posts and from Selco and I must admit that I am a bit jealous of people living in safety and don’t have to lock their cars and homes.

    The national elections will be in May and lets hope that some positive change come from that.

    #6267
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    – if an intruder jumps over your wall , you are not allowed to shoot . The reason is that he might just be looking for some water. It sound stupid I know.
    – if an intruder breach your second line of defense and enters your home you are still not allowed to shoot or attack the villain.
    – if the intruder is not armed with a gun you certainly not allowed to shoot. – if the intruder is armed you still not allowed to shoot.
    – basically you are only allowed to shoot if the intruder points a gun at you or runs toward you with a knife or some other weapon.

    We have similar laws where I live. Our police headman mentioned he very often finds knives in these scenarios… What matters though is where the intruder dies. Should be within your house or garden area. If someone keeps going when they know someone else is at home, I assume they are armed.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #6270
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Here are few information from my experience and looking at the law here, and I think some things are same everywhere.

    If someone attacking you, and you are forced to take him down, it is very important was that attacker armed or not.
    Because my job, I very often found people dead, after they attack someone, defender simply shot him, or stab in some cases.

    And there s man laying down with wounds on him, dead, and simply next to him there is knife, or bat or something similar, he was armed, and in the eyes of law that makes everything different.

    And sometimes defender had few wounds, or sometimes just scratches, or sometimes no wounds but he or she screamed a lot “don t kill me please” (as neighbors said to the authority) or defender had his clothes torn apart (while he or she was defending) etc.

    And of course wounds were on the front side of attackers, so you could say he was moving to the defender, chest wounds for example, if he had wounds on his back you could say that he was running from the defender, not attacking him.

    So without giving any advices here, there is something to learn from all of this if someone is attacking someone who is gonna shoot him.

    #6274
    Profile photo of Big_Five
    Big_Five
    Survivalist
    member1

    The laws these days protect the criminal (human rights) and the law abiding tax payer needs to build a mini jail to live in to keep the scum out.

    You are right Jay…it al depends on where the intruder dies. The law states that women are allowed to shoot if the intruder enters the house (armed or not), but us men must be in a 50/50 situation before we can pull the trigger.

    There was a case once where a criminal broke through the roof tiles and accidentally fell through the ceiling and broke his leg as he landed in side the house. He sued the house owner and WON THE CASE.

    #6275
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Definitely a lot to be learned.

    That is why it is also important to train in hand to hand combat and firearms training – to react quickly but to know why you are shooting at someone. Those targets that jump up with the grandmother holding her handbag comes to mind. What is behind the target you are shooting at..

    #6279
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    Being in a rather corrupt country can be a curse or blessing. We do cultivate good relationships with our local law enforcement. There are also small boxes you get on your property that people see you pay the police to check on your home once a day. It’s like a monthly fee (around 30 USD) to get a bit special treatment. Good investment.

    Especially on the countryside, usually people know who causes problems. The village law is also still in effect where we are so there is rarely crime in our area and if… the villagers take care of this themselves most of the time. They have pretty rustic ways of doing that but it does seem to keep things pretty much in line.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

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