Viewing 15 posts - 256 through 270 (of 383 total)
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  • #42184
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Leo,

    Those spee-iders will mess you up. Arachnus Deathicus apparently don’t play around… the thing seems to be related to the Brown Recluse over here. Bite causes necrosis.

    At first, I took your remark “I dislocated my trigger finger” to mean you dislocated your finger shooting the spider.. heh.. I would have used fire, but I suppose a shotgun works just as well…

    How to get rid of them without sprays? Good question. We have a service come around every few months and treat for bugs and stuff and we’re still dealing with them… it’s not like we’re not clean or anything. It’s what happens when you live in the country in an old house…

    If you all have services that spray for bugs and spiders, find out what they use – not a fogger – and then see if you can get ahold of some…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

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    #42187
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Leopard, poisonous spiders are yet another reason to get out of SA. I have no use for spiders or snakes and fortunately live where the spiders and snakes are not poisonous. The climate is just too cold for the nasty ones. Cold is good.

    #42195
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Stay away from Boric Acid. Many home fixes but what works when others fail is glue traps! I found they even grab and hold copperhead snakes!
    Robin

    #42231
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Copperhead snakes! Oh dear. Malgus, I laughed so hard my stomach still hurts.
    My son got bitten on his face when he was about two years old. It took two antibiotic causes to safe his eye. I can still remember it well.
    A friend came over for coffee, saw the spider and killed it, telling me it was poisonous. Then the school phoned me, telling me my son got a blue eye. That was strange for they did not see him fall or anybody hitting him. I decided to go fetch him at the school and on the way remembered the little red spot I saw on his cheek while putting him in his car seat, thinking he did not wake up with that mosquito bite. We went straight to the doctors rooms. She gave one look and said Spider bite. It got worse before it got better. He could not see through his eye with the swelling. It went from blue to black, but it healed over time.
    Today I carry Betanoid syrup in my BOB and tablets on keyring. I always take the doctors antibiotic prescription, but ask the pharmacist not to mix it (if it’s a syrup) The one pharmacist even check the expiry date with a smile for me..
    This week I will “spring” clean one room at a time. I will see if I can find sticky traps to buy or try to make them myself.Thanks Robin. I googled spearmint for spiders…Will empty my bottle of mint essential oil under the beds. I will plant more spearmint in the summer. Maybe even brush my teeth more often.. hehe

    #42813
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    After the recent incidences regarding N2 hijackings near Cape Town International Airport, we have received an urgent message to warn all drivers to either stay clear of the area, or follow these tips:

    Travellers are being warned of the modus operandi being used by these alleged hijackers:

    – Do not drive over any cardboard boxes or plastic bags left in the middle of the road as these could contain cement or rocks and cause serious damage to the car.

    – As the driver you are then forced to pull over, putting yourself at risk of ambush alongside the road.

    – Additionally, road users are advised to be especially careful during poor visibility or after dark.

    1. Always drive in the right hand lane. (Please note!! In South Africa we drive on the left lane. – This mean drive further away from the side of the road if possible)

    2. Never, ever stop on the N2, drive on your cars rims if you have to, but keep going until you see a tow truck, the drivers are armed.

    3. Don’t rely on help from the Saps or the Metro cops it is very unlikely to arrive. ( SAPS – South African Police Service)

    4. Fit anti-hijacking smash and grab coatings to all your car windows.

    5. Consider driving up the wrong side of the N2, in the emergency lane with your hazard lights on, from the flyover back to the Airport garage as this is the shortest route to help.

    6. Load all the Cape Town crew cellphone numbers and emergency numbers into your phone.

    http://www.womenonwheels.co.za/safety/tips-driving-n2-near-airport/

    —- I would add arm yourself with enough amo to take them all out…

    #42815
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    When faced with a flat tyre, ideally you would stop and change to your spare tyre. However, (in South Africa especially) some areas may be too dangerous to stop.

    In these situations, while you can drive on your flat tyre to the nearest petrol station or somewhere you feel safe – it is going to ruin your tyre and possibly the rims of your car. This is still better than risking your life or your safety, by stopping in an unsafe area!

    A run flat tyre is a vehicle tyre that has been designed to resist the effects of deflation when punctured. Letting you avoid hazardous tyre changes and allowing you to continue the journey at a reduced speed. Run flat tyres have been described as the “first important revolution in tyre design since the invention of the pneumatic tyre.”

    With low loads, one or two persons without luggage: approximately 240 kilometers at a maximum speed of 80 km/h
    With moderate loads, two persons with full luggage or four persons without luggage: approximately 145 kilometers at a maximum speed of 80 km/h
    With a full load, while towing a trailer or four persons or more with full luggage: approximately 48 kilometers at a maximum speed of 80 km/h
    How does Run-Flat Technology work?

    It is important to consider how a tyre loses air pressure and how the run flat tyre manages to ensure safety and continuous driving. A tyre loses air either through penetration or a cut to the tread or sidewall area, usually causing loss of control of the vehicle or forcing the driver to stop and change the tyre.

    There are many different types of run flat tyres from a variety of tyre manufacturers. We can however identify 3 basic technologies:

    Self-supporting: the tyre is built with stiffer side-walls that can bear the weight of the vehicle even when the pressure within the tyre is greatly reduced. The bead around the edge of the tyre is also specialized to grip the wheel rim such as to avoid becoming detached from the rim. The tyre’s side walls are usually made of an extra layer supported by a heat-resistant cord to keep the tyre in the original position even under the weight or road bumps.

    Self-sealing: these tyres contain an extra lining within the tyre that self-seals in the event of a small hole due to a nail or screw. In this way, the loss of air is prevented from the outset so that that the tyre is either permanently self-repairing or at least loses air very slowly. ( Ultra seal – http://www.ultraseal.com/index.html )

    Auxiliary-supported: in this system, there is an additional support ring attached to the wheel that can support the weight of the vehicle in the event of a loss of pressure.

    http://www.womenonwheels.co.za/safety/driving-on-a-flat-tyre/

    #44507
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Leopard, when you been?
    Robin

    #44563
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Hi, Robin
    I think about you guys at SHTF School every day. All the stuff Selco teach us and what I learn on this forum goes through my mind. The solar panels, gardening, water pumps.From the horrible stuff happening in my area – all the signs of the economy falling apart, how people simply do not want to believe that our world could change to no water no food no electricity and a lot more violence. I’ve been trying to get out of the city, getting to know other areas. All the protest has been keeping me away from areas where I was supposed to do business. It is as if I must plan my routes more and more carefully.

    I am battling to sleep well at night and too much to do during the day. (It is not that easy to be a single woman) I talk to friends and they will say things like “But you will be ok – you have a strong mind. You can cope with all this stress, running a business on you own.” Inside I want to scream…. It’s not fine. Everything could change. Someone might kill my dog tonight, break into my house and kill me in front of my child. I might not be able to keep my business going and my clients might not be able to afford my fees much longer. I might be on my own when SHTF trying to get out of the city. With not enough rain my vegetable garden goes dry when I go away for a few days. To keep things alive is hard work! ….. But I keep quiet… I just smile and say Thank you

    #44568
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    Sometimes we tend to forget that, relatively speaking, those of us here in the US still have it far better than so many others around the world. Some may find it corny, some perhaps even offensive (I hope not), but perhaps some specific prayers for our friends elsewhere might be in order, even while we’re praying for our own well being. (I’m not advocating printed prayers openly here of course, just personal and private ones. I’m personally going to keep that more in the forefront of my mind so I don’t forget others with whom I would not want to trade places.)

    Leopard, If you can find it on line for little cost, I’d recommend a wonderful little (literally) book by a Native American author, Joseph M. Marshall III, titled Keep Going – The Art of Perseverance. Amazon has it for as little as 1¢ + shipping in used copies (I got one of those and was very pleased), though I don’t know what shipping might be to you. It is unlike most “self help” books with similar titles. If it doesn’t happen to “grab” you right away, keep reading. It could probably be read in a day even by a relatively slow reader. I personally found it to be exceptionally helpful in reducing worry, keeping a more positive outlook, and bringing peace. Knowing what Native Americans have endured through the centuries, and being familiar with some of this author’s other work, I was able to quickly appreciate the contents – and it got better the further I got. It gives new meaning (literally) to the concept of just taking one more step. The author is a master at Native American story telling, so the concepts sink in deeper rather than just consciously processing “advice” as in so many “self help” books.

    #44570
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Found it! Will take about a month to be delivered for R180 Thank You
    Keep Going – The Art of Perseverance.

    http://www.takealot.com/books/all?qsearch=Keep+Going\%3A+The+Art+of+Perseverance+by+Joseph+M.+Marshall+III&_sb=1&_dt=3&_r=1

    I’ve been reading more lately, almost every “waiting” moment. Been craving knowledge on so many levels. :) I will pray for you too. That is what keeps me going

    #44576
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    If you haven’t already ordered it, you can get it immediately as a downloadable .pdf file about 4 items below the one that you ordered (for R66) on that same site. If you have something to read it with (smart phone, tablet, etc.) you can take it with you wherever you go and read it in pieces. But then some people (myself included) appreciate picking up a real book and going through the pages. Just thought I’d point that out in case you’d missed it and were interested.

    #44583
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Thanks ! I am a book fan, but do buy ebooks if I can not get hold a book. (I love my IPhoneS6 Plus)

    Some travel tips for exploring Africa Link : http://www.iol.co.za/travel/travel-tips/top-tips-for-exploring-africa-1.1930509

    #44672
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Water restrictions hit Joburg.
    Gauteng province can’t use hosepipes or sprinklers from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. until further notice as supply is under “severe strain,” Rand Water Services said on the government news agency’s website Wednesday. “Should the restrictions not be adhered to, the situation may worsen.”

    http://www.iol.co.za/business/news/water-restrictions-hit-joburg-1.1937221

    #44678
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    So sorry to hear that, Leopard. It sounds like southern California in the US, with your other conditions roughly equivalent to certain neighborhoods in and around Los Angeles. I just looked at some climate data and see that you (hopefully) should be coming out of the driest part of the year (assuming Pretoria is representative of Guatang Province). I hope the rains come soon, steadily, and sufficiently for you.

    #44688
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Leopard, remind us again as to how much of the water problem is drought versus mismanagement of the water system. Is the government taking meaningful steps to resolve the crisis?

Viewing 15 posts - 256 through 270 (of 383 total)

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