Viewing 15 posts - 226 through 240 (of 383 total)
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  • #40366
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    When no one else will stand up for you, what else is left for a person to do?

    #40389

    This is the type of murder that is not labelled Xenophobia. It is just one more senseless killing that we are told is normal crime. Because the current xenophobia is happening in the streets it gets noticed and given a name. They go from house to house and hunt for foreigners. Are we not hunted when they break into our houses and kill us? It seems being white in this country you just fall under the normal crime label.

    http://www.algoafm.co.za/article.aspx?id=12569

    http://www.sapeople.com/2015/04/20/nigerian-thoughts-on-phobias-xenophobia-south-africa/

    http://www.rdm.co.za/politics/2015/04/22/direct-anger-at-anc-government-not-at-rhodes-and-his-ilk

    #40501
    Profile photo of P1LGR1M
    P1LGR1M
    Survivalist
    member2

    What is the law on owning handguns, rifles or shotguns?
    Robin

    Can’t see that anyone answered this, so here goes.

    We are allowed one handgun or shotgun on a self defence license (section 13) and in very, very rare circumstances you might be able to get an SLR on self defence (section 14), I know of one such license that was granted to a farmer.

    Next you get occasional sport or hunting licenses (section 15), here you have another three slots available if you have already used one for section 13, or four if not. Here you can get a second handgun, a shotgun and rifle (but not any semi auto’s, as they are restricted weapons), or three different rifles, or two shotguns and a rifle, etc., but you can only get one additional handgun. On both section 13 and 15 licenses you are limited to 200 rounds of ammo per license.

    Next is the dedicated sport or hunting licenses (section 16), you have to belong to a recognised club and qualify annually to the clubs’ criteria to keep the dedicated status, and then if you can motivate the need for the weapon and your club will endorse it, you can get it, this includes SLR’s like the AR15 platform, etc., but it may not be a fully automatic weapon. There are also no limits on the amount of ammo you may purchase and own, well only limit really will be your bank balance…

    There is also a collectors license (section 17) and then various categories within the collectors ranks, with the top being category A collectors that may own fully automatic weapons, but there is really only a handful of them in the country and they fall under extremely strict guidelines and rules.

    Before you can apply for any class of weapon, you have to do a proficiency test and get a competency card from the police. We have four classes of weapons; handgun, shotgun, manual rifle and self loading rifle (aka hand machine carbine) and then the theory test relating to the law. For all licenses you have to submit a motivation as to why you need the firearm, be it self defence, then you must show the need by including crime stats for your area, the routes you travel, etc. For occasional licenses you should at least show that you have done some sport shooting or informal hunting, but you don’t have to belong to a club. For dedicated licenses you must show participation in club events, get membership letters, endorsement letters, etc.

    Lots of people have the perception that getting a license in SA is impossible, but it is not that difficult, you just need to jump through all the hoops and have all your documents in order, some patience also helps, but on average a license application gets completed in about three months time (might sound long, but not so long ago it took a few year).

    #40506
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Though what you can have is pretty limited, it would seem that most could be armed if they so choose.

    This may not be the time for levity but this has me thinking about an old joke. What do you call a handgun, shotgun, and rifle in Texas? A starter kit.

    #40815
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Hey..

    Anyone heard from Leopard, Dorette or any of the South African contingent?

    It’s been over a week and not a peep… at least, not to me.

    Anyone heard from them? Starting to get worried.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #40816
    Profile photo of P1LGR1M
    P1LGR1M
    Survivalist
    member2

    Hey..

    Anyone heard from Leopard, Dorette or any of the South African contingent?

    It’s been over a week and not a peep… at least, not to me.

    Anyone heard from them? Starting to get worried.

    I’m still here,not sure about the others though…

    #40817

    Hi

    I’m here!! Thanks for your concern. Have been contacting an emigration lawyer and been busy with that as well as following what I could on the Baltimore Riots. It is funny no matter where in the world there is always a common denominator.

    A friend of mine wrote this this morning:
    Social scientists know well the critical and potentially explosive interplay between expectations, aspirations and reality. A gap between what people expect to be done for them and what reality is or can provide, ferments revolution. When expectations are high and aspirations are low you have very little chance of reversing or even slowing down a slide into Yemen, a failed society with widespread misery.

    Reverse that to a state where aspirations are high and expectations are low, and you will consistently uplift reality and fuel innovation, entrepreneurship, progress and prosperity. This has been shown repeatedly in history with dramatic examples of post-war Germany and Japan. Imagine what those countries would have become, and how unlikely their subsequent strength would have been, had they adopted a national attitude that the rest of the world owed them a living, and they could expect to be nurtured back to economic health beyond the kick-start of a Marshall plan.

    It boils down to a simple equation: when people by and large are giving more than they are taking you create surpluses and prosperity; when people by and large are taking more than they are giving you create deficits and poverty. Aspirations fuel contribution and giving; expectations fuel taking and demands. Wherever you look in this country, you see the symptoms of rampant expectations – protests, strikes, crime and violence. Perhaps President Zuma (see report here) should heed the message of his wiser elder: we may have inherited a culture of violence but it is inflamed and maintained by a culture of entitlement, something which politicians themselves have largely created. We are witnessing the devastating effects of a worsening reality and waning aspirations.

    For example, we all accept the absolute need for social security, but it is for the most part seen in isolation with little regard for unintended consequences, such as its impact on raising expectations, and weakening aspirations. Another example is the holy cow of affirmative action and BEE. Irrespective of their laudable intentions, they increase the expectations of one group, diminish the aspirations of another; which is then expected to mentor and empower the first group. For a large part the second group sabotages that effort out of pique and insecurity and one is left on balance with the toxic mix of higher expectations, lower aspirations and a worsened reality from incompetent deliveries.

    One simply cannot isolate an issue or problem from the triangular prism of expectations, aspirations and reality. They are either a cause or an effect within that vital prism, each reflecting on and influencing the other. Many of these are blatantly self-evident, yet we continue to ignore them and focus on fragmented parts in a dismally misguided belief that solving one issue will have no price to pay elsewhere – a cost that is seldom calculable or understood.

    #40819
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Hallo hallo ! I’m still fine too, thank you ! Think about my SHTF friends every day. I’ve been trying to keep things going – business in SA taking blows from all directions currently. But in the end we always say “Boer maak ‘n plan” That means -We always make a plan- …we simply do not give up.
    Dorette an article you might find helpful http://www.merisemag.com/eng/the-emotional-rollercoaster-ride-of-migration/

    Some distant family was visiting SA last month. We had a lovely time together. Have not seen them in many years. After a lovely meal and looking at all the children playing together; their son trying to understand his niece and nephews fast chatter in Afrikaans. His mom looked at her son and told me, “ It was wonderful being back and seeing all of you, but I think it is time to go home now”

    #40821

    Hi Leopard, thanks for the article. Here is an extract from it which sort of depicts the way I feel right here while I am still in South Africa. “You leave your language and your culture: everything suddenly feels remote and you may feel empty inside, lost and lonely. You experience a sense of disassociation; everything around you feels unreal, you do not feel real yourself.”

    I think I have already said goodbye to South Africa in a way. I find I cannot relate to the idiocy of the government or the general population who is putting them in power and at the same time protesting about service delivery. Burning down and breaking down in an attempt to be heard – or maybe just for fun. The lack of understanding that if a government do not do for you what they promise you can vote them out and you do not have to kill foreigners, burn, break etc.

    The way they are taking Afrikaans out of Universities and schools, rewriting our history with their own version, BEE and AA. The Afrikaner and the white man are being pushed down and will slowly become extinct. So I do not see a future for my children in this country and the “push” factor is almost where I do not care where we go as long as we can make a living.

    Maybe, some of the guys here can assist me with Panama. I have heard that there are lots of opportunities and the cost of living is low. My husband is just worried about the language. The unfortunate thing for South Africans are that if they want to go to an english speaking country like the US, Australia, New Zealand there is a penalty to get in if you are on the old side.

    Anyhow, that is about all the news I’ve got for now.

    #40828
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I’m glad dorette and Leopard have stopped by. I was beginning to wonder what was going on.

    In looking at where to emigrate, don’t forget the other English speaking countries Canada and Ireland. Also, if considering the US, no matter how the Baltimore nonsense was covered in your media, blacks are only 13% of the US population even if the media makes their presence seem larger.

    I have no personal knowledge of Panama, but my understanding is that the professional, business, & govt. class often speak English, though clearly Spanish is the dominant language. Given the long US involvement with the Canal Zone, you are likely most apt to find English speakers in that corridor. Costa Rica is another very stable country in that region. It has become popular with American retirees moving down there and vacationers, so clearly there is a growing English presence in that country.

    dorette, it sounds like you are well along on the emotional transition path. Good luck.

    #40834
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    having lived in costa rica for 5 years and still having friends there i would not suggest it as it is getting drug crazy violence with guns. it is hidden by the new and government as it is bad for main source of revenue tourism. There are also MANY pedophiles and under age sex tourism. Many things are weird as in you pay people to line up to pay bills for you. Things are expensive descent house now is over 500k to north american standard ie it wont fall down in first earth quake nor burn down because of shoddy electrical.

    If you have kids you will need to private school that is about 2-5k a month usd per kid in a good school with recognized grades internationally, ie all the rich, diplomats kids go there, so lots of drug use and sex.I know a daughter of a friend who was raped in school by class mates. No charges cause of who the kids involved parents where.

    If you go to local school good luck getting any education out side of the country.

    ON plus side if you home school you might do well, food if you buy at local markets is incredible and cheap… i LOVE meat but would eat 3-5 meals min a week just fruits and veggies it was so tasty.

    workers are cheap but you get what you pay for had 6 staff with a payroll of just over 2000 usd a month and i was considered over paying staff.

    There is not much work for your kids once they grow up that will match rest of world what money you bring in will be what family has for a long time as you cant get ahead under normal circumstances there. If you become too successful you will draw the attention of one of the big 7 families… either you sell ,join or be crushed.it is the mob and never forget you are outsider.

    IF you need to mortgage forget going there the interest rates are insane think 24% plus and no way to make the $$ you need locally to service a debt. vehicles are super pricey due to tax and fuel costs. there are back room deals you can get cars for but that is a whole other conversation.

    #40923
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Thank you so much for all the information, Namelus. Thank you for taking the time. The only way we can make an informed decision is the have ‘true on the ground’ information like this.

    #40930
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Dorette,

    I lived in Panama for a couple years. Was stationed there.

    The good: Upcountry – the Panamanian highlands – is beautiful and not too hot.

    The bad: When I was there last, 1996, it was literally the Wild West. If you had money, you could literally buy anything… drugs, guns, police protection, even human beings. Yes, I am talking about chattel slavery. It still exists, just under another name. Plenty of bandits upcountry, and it always helps to carry a full ice chest/cooler full of beer with you – when you get stopped by bandits, pretend you’re ecstatic to see them (Ahh! My friends! So good to see you!) and start handing out icy cold beers. Chances are they’ll leave you unmolested. I know, I’ve done it.

    There’s two seasons in Panama. One where it’s hot and rains once a day. The other is where it’s hot and rains once a day – all day.

    On Day 1, I was given a briefing. I quote: “There are 100 things in Panama that can kill you. 99 will kill you, and the last one will kill you and eat you.” It’s true. Plenty of sharp, poisonous things down there – including the trees. The Black Palm tree is notorious.

    The Panamanian system for building roads is thus:

    1.. Mow a hole through the jungle with a bulldozer.
    2. Pave what you just mowed.
    3. Wait for it to rain.
    4. Mark where the rains flooded your “road”.
    5. Dig up the floody bits and put in drainage.
    6. Repave.

    If you own a vehicle, it would be a good idea to invest in the best 4X4 vehicle you can find, and then install a breather kit – also known as a snorkel. It is entirely possible for you to hit a flooded bit of road and have the water wash over the top of your vehicle.

    Cops are notoriously corrupt and it is an outstanding idea to buy yourself a couple when you first get there. This is simply buying yourself protection. In addition to payoffs, providing the local cops – especially the ones who are working for you – with gifts from time to time, like good Maglite flashlights, duty gear, food such as canned ham, bottles of good alcohol, beer, etc, will pay dividends in the future if you get into a situation. Let’s say some scumbag breaks on to your property in the night and mysteriously somehow gets himself shot dead. Having a few cops in your hip pocket can be damn handy…

    If you go there, you will see great beauty and soul-destroying poverty. It is entirely possible to live a good life there, as the cost of living is very low – in what used to be the Canal Zone, you will find plenty of expat Americans, etc. The Chinese are building “another” canal – one that can handle bigger, modern ships – so they’re probably going to overrun the country sooner or later, much the way the Americans did 100 years ago, the French before us and the Spanish before them… they’ll find out it’s a devil’s bargain, probably too late.

    If I were going to live anywhere, I’d live in the Highlands.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #40935
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    I talked to a good friend that lived there for years. Ditto on what Malgus said. Also, Panama City is turning into a very astute banking center. If you have any skill in that area look there for a job.
    Robin

    #40942
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Malgus, sounds like why New Zealand is becoming the preferred location for yankee expats. Everyone there wants to share their beer.

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