Viewing 12 posts - 16 through 27 (of 27 total)
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  • #26150
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    Coughing and sneezing is bodily fluids. I would not consider that airborne, if I understand correctly what an airborne illnesses is. Most viruses cannot live outside the body for very long. Most viruses are killed by exposure to less than 24 hours of sunlight (UV radiation). So even if Ebola is airborne it will not live very long outside the body. Therefore, you can protect yourself by not visiting sick people and having them cough and sneezing all over you. Also avoid hang-out in hospitals!

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2014/10/03/can-you-catch-ebola-from-an-infected-blanket/

    If I remember correctly, Ebola ONLY becomes infectious after the signs of illness occur. This is very important because with the common flu, which killed 35,000 worldwide last year, you are infectious BEFORE you see signs of illness. This means you can infect people BEFORE you know that you are sick. (Now, that’s a characteristic you find in true pandemics.)

    You can be sure the patient with Ebola is under complete lock down. Anyone that has had contact with him is under quarantine, which is basically “house arrest”. The state has incredible powers under quarantine laws to restrict your liberty and freedom. In some cases, the state can use you as a lab rat.

    http://www.cdc.gov/quarantine/specificlawsregulations.html.

    One more fact about viruses. Viruses are not even considered a true “life form” because they cannot reproduce without the cellular mechanism of real body cell. The virus takes over the cellular mechanism of a body cell so it can reproduce. Without the cellular mechanism of a living cell, viruses are inert. So, you won’t see viruses reproducing out in the open on surfaces like some bacteria will. This is way I’m pretty sure Ebola will not cause the next pandemic… Of course, I could be wrong.

    Go here for some information about how to improve your immune system’s resistance to all types of viruses: http://eatkamloops.org/swine-flu-what-to-do/.

    #26206
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    Since I did a lot of reading in the past months about Ebola I agree with C.

    Ebola is a pretty “heavy” virus and it would take a lot before it becomes airborne. Its not impossible but veeeery unlikely. I think one of the things that makes this a bit more scary for us is to hear how quickly it spreads and that even medical professionals got infected. We got to keep in mind that those places in Africa are so different in terms of sanitation to the most developed world.

    Regardless of this, I think Ebola is very interesting to follow and I believe I learn(ed) a lot about the dynamics of an virus outbreak and how people try to contain it. Its also a great reminder to make sure you have your first aid / sanitation emergency preparation in place.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #26213
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Here what I found, everybody make your own conclusions.

    Filamentous 970 nm long for Ebolavirus. Diameter is about 80nm.http://viralzone.expasy.org/all_by_species/207.html
    970 nanometers =0.97 microns

    SURVIVAL OUTSIDE HOST: The virus can survive in liquid or dried material for a number of days (23). Infectivity is found to be stable at room temperature or at 4°C for several days, and indefinitely stable at -70°C (6, 20). Infectivity can be preserved by lyophilisation http://www.msdsonline.com/resources/msds-resources/free-safety-data-sheet-index/ebola-virus.aspx

    Respiratory transmission depends upon the production of aerosols that contain virus particles. Speaking, singing, and normal breathing all produce aerosols, while coughing and sneezing lead to more forceful expulsion. While coughing may produce several hundred droplets, a good sneeze can generate up to 20,ooo. Aerosolized particles produced by these activities are of different sizes. The largest droplets fall to the ground within a few meters and will transmit an infection only to those in the immediate vicinity. Other droplets travel a distance determined by their size. Those droplets 1-4 microns in diameter are called ‘droplet nuclei'; these remain suspended in the air for very long periods and may not only travel long distances, but can reach the lower respiratory tract. Inhalation of droplets and droplet nuclei places virus in the upper respiratory tract, where it may initiate infection.

    http://www.virology.ws/2009/04/29/influenza-virus-transmission/

    #26214
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    One thing we are all forgetting is the all viruses change with mutations with other viruses so the Ebola of today may not be the same Ebola of tomorrow. This is something that happens with the flu viruses every year. Have you even gotten the flu and then weeks of a month latter got it again? That is what happen it mutated with another flu virus.

    The Ebola may mutate with a lighter flu virus and become airborne. Viruses are incredible.

    #26266
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    The Spanish nurse who has ebola probably got it thru her face mask. That would be my quess. Viruses are indeed incredible and have a wicked attack method. Days can pass and that one little virus particle can be alive and waiting for a victim. Luck and stay away from airports. Biohazard Area – enter at your own risk.

    #26284
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Brulen,
    I suspect face masks as well. For one they rarely fit without a leak. Unless you have a self contained pressurized breathing apparatus in the presence of the virus your going to get sick. That’s my belief.

    #26292
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Ebola in Spain. Spanish nursing assistant became infected now we know that the nurse must know how to protect them self so what happen?

    http://news.yahoo.com/nurse-spain-gets-ebola-raising-global-concern-062847061–politics.html

    #26299
    Profile photo of Roadracer
    Roadracer
    Survivalist
    member7

    The Spanish nurse case is very strange. As others have said, they should have the most up to date isolation equipment. I wonder if this is a case of carelessness. I can’t imagine being careless around an ebola patient, but mistakes are made. With all the reassurances that are being made by government agencies, cases seem to be popping up. My concern is that beside ebola there are several major outbreaks of various viruses including Marburg fever, and the upper respiratory virus that is attacking kids.

    Is this a precursor of what the future holds for us?

    #26303
    Profile photo of Inshala
    Inshala
    Veteran
    member4

    freedom,

    Do you think that Spanish Flu was a weapon or a natural phenomenon? Consider that we had just engaged in the most brutal war to date in which chemical weapons were undisputably implemented. As c stated, it is the only true pandemic the world has seen in the last hundred years.

    I’m going to have to side with Roadracer’s skepticism on weaponizing Ebola. There are far more lethal and infectious bio-weapons in existence. I also agree with c’s optimistic assessment of the disease. He’s provided some pretty hard facts and until we see some proof that Ebola has mutated, then we’re still in good shape.

    I will confess that I am EXTREMELY concerned with the deployment of 3,000 service members to “fight” Ebola in Africa. Unlike, the previous panics (with West Nile, H1N1, and such) we never deployed a Brigade size element to “fight” an illness.

    Oh, and BTW…THANK YOU, everybody, for buying out all the MOPP suits in The Sportsman”s Guide! I swear one day there were in stock and, without exaggeration, SOLD OUT the next! I’ll have to keep checking back. :P

    "If I'm gonna die, I'm gonna die historic on the Fury Road."

    #26313
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I believe you guys that are playing down ebola as a problem should re-examine the evidence. Even WHO is changing their dialog concerning ebola.

    “The World Health Organisation (WHO) has set out infection prevention and control guidance, which should be followed by all countries.
    It is designed to give advice to any country providing direct and non-direct care to patients with suspected or confirmed Ebola.
    Ebola is highly infectious, but it can be prevented, the WHO said.
    It is spread through direct contact with bodily fluids, including blood, saliva, urine, semen, vomit and diarrhea, of an infected patient.
    It can also be spread via contact with contaminated surfaces or equipment, including bed linen soiled by body fluids.”

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2783332/Husband-Spanish-nurse-contracted-Ebola-quarantine-health-authorities-admit-DON-T-KNOW-contracted-virus.html#ixzz3FUVPuwUB

    #26315
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    don’t forget sweat 74, it can ooze right out of the skin in the terminal phases.

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #26316
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    KOS,
    Sweat is not my worry, no way am I hugging a hot sweaty ebola patient. The problem that people do not want to recognize is that a 1 micron virus (ebloa) is capable of escaping the mouth and becoming airborne either as a single particle or combined with a droplet.

    Droplets 1-4 microns in diameter are called ‘droplet nuclei’; these remain suspended in the air for very long periods and may not only travel long distances, but can reach the lower respiratory tract. Inhalation of droplets and droplet nuclei places virus in the upper respiratory tract, where it may initiate infection. A sneeze can create 20,000 droplets.

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