Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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  • #18912
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    I would like some input on container homes as to which finishing materials for prep purposes work well on an outside insulation/ finish.

    I want to keep as much steel in the container as possible as much non toxic materials.

    Currently i am looking at
    using basf spray foam 6 inches outside from top of rib and another 2 inches inside, then attaching metal lass and covering in concrete both inside and out. The metal lass is attached to studs welded in place 12inch long 3/8 diameter with threads. this will allow me to finish next year outside with split rock and have anchor points. giving a wall thickness of 18 inches and an r value of over 60.

    I want to know about how to insulate the floors in a container if anyone has experience.

    #18917
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Namelus – I have known many people who have done this over the years. I used to manage ocean-going cargo ships (mostly container ships)…so….

    Anyway, latest experience was helping friends last year do this. This is the site they used that provides the best information they could find – all in one place. It turned out very well. HTH

    #18921
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    namelus, the two areas that you need to look into is the roof and the floor. The roof is flat so rain water may with time rust the corners so if you can build some small trusts so the rain goes down on one side that would help. If you do build some small trust on the roof you can add insulation.

    On the floor you can put down 1×4 treated wood and in between the 1×4 a 1″ foam insulation then add your flooring on top(wood flooring).

    There are many other ideas. This is just what I am thinking. Remember to put the container high and anchored well.

    #18923
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Namelus,
    If you have not done so yet, I think you should research ventilation systems so you can maintain clean air and reduce/remove moisture.

    #18933
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Yes moisture is a big issue with these types of containers. I have one that I have used for several years as a workshop/storage shed. With good seals these things are dang near air tight and when they heat up in the sun the condensate horribly. You can put a roof vent in them and relieve this problem but since you are looking to use it as a bug out home you will want to figure out a way to filter the air coming into container.

    Also look at the weight ratings for stacking them. It will give you an idea of how much weight the walls and roof can support. Depending on how much concrete and split rock you are looking to use on the walls they may not hold that much weight, especially if you start cutting doors and windows into them.

    #18934
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    namelus, matt76 is right about the weight on the walls and roof, need to look into that. Maybe build the structure walls dependent from the container to hold it self up and it’s weight. They sell steel columns that can hold a roof over the container. Sometimes they will add a steel column on each side were you add a window.

    #18935
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Namelus
    I don’t know where the water table is where you live but burying the container is another option or at least putting it into the side of a hill. The dirt will give the walls support and will also insulate better. You will get a geothermal effect making heating and cooling without any electricity much easier as well. There will still be ventilation issues to deal with but you may find this option cheaper and more efficient in the long run. Just a thought.

    #18937
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Guys,
    I don’t believe weight is a problem in any respect. These get stacked 15 or 20 high full of cargo. The containers at the bottom hold up to the loads. Corrogated steel is super strong In compression parallel to the folds.

    #18945
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Namelus/Matt – Do NOT bury shipping containers!!! They are yes, meant to be stacked but the walls aren’t as strong as you might think. Many people have regretted this. You would need to do a great deal of extra work in order to use them safely in this way. http://graywolfsurvival.com/2625/why-you-shouldnt-bury-a-shipping-container-for-a-shtf-bunker/ I could find quickly. Easier than trying to write it out myself. Long dam* day.

    #18959
    Profile photo of Novus Ordo
    Novus Ordo
    Hunter
    rprepper

    Namelus/74/All – Tweva is exactly right. These containers are not meant for burying. The ceiling/walls are not much of a weight bearing structure, only the corners are. During one of my deployments many of the services used these as temporary buildings/ammo magazines. More than one of them partially collapsed when the soldiers tried to “harden” the structures by placing many sandbags and/or HESCO’s (filled with dirt) on top of them, but not necessarily in line with the structural parts. It was bad enough for the Army to send out a type of caution report to NOT do this. I have seen sites where someone has buried containers and even placed them side-by-side and cut an arc in two walls to join the rooms but they did a lot of reinforcement with steel and engineering.

    Arms discourage and keep the invader and plunderer in awe, and preserve order in the world as well as property... mischief would ensue were the law-abiding deprived of the use of them.
    - Thomas Paine

    #18961
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    If I’m not mistaken namelus is using foam and stucco on the walls and not making an earthen bunker.

    #18963
    Profile photo of Novus Ordo
    Novus Ordo
    Hunter
    rprepper

    74 – understood, but wanted to add to it in case further mods might lead to exceeding the limits of the ceiling/sides or other readers had their own ideas on construction. The graywolf link was good – they’re like a beer can on the sides; it doesn’t take much. Better safe than sorry…

    Arms discourage and keep the invader and plunderer in awe, and preserve order in the world as well as property... mischief would ensue were the law-abiding deprived of the use of them.
    - Thomas Paine

    #19075
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    Was not really looking at stucco type finish more the like spray crete they do for foundations in highrise.

    For underground part if you are going to use find concrete or galvanized pipe suppliers with diameters big enough. the ones for tunnels for cars on highway have already made culverts for many sizes drop and use. or you can use

    http://apexfoundations.com style of walls roof to make an ug covered area

    #19076
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    namelus, the apex foundations are great, look like they are well made. That will be great is you use them. When you build this out please take some images and post them, I am very interested.

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