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  • #6296
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    There has been lots of great posts on the forum, many about what tool, weapons or item to have. Recently the posts about tomahawks caught my attention because I never concidered them as really effective cutting tools. However as a survival tool/weapon they look pretty good. But sometimes you got to go to the dance with what ya brought. I’m posting a picture of my axe family (leaving out adzes, and splitters) Each one has a specific purpose making it a more effective tool then the other in a limited role.
    The axe with a 3′ handle and heavy bit can cut down any tree, man or beast. But what a pain to carry in a thicket. The hand axe, designed for carpentry and hewing is my favorite all around axe. The Estwing canot be beat for accurate controllable cuts, heavy weighted head cuts deep. But my take it with me hunting favorite is the shingle hammer. Very light weight, just big enough to cut through a deer pelvis without a struggle. When all else fails use a saw.

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    #6314
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    I thought I was the only one who used a shingling hammer. Much better for hunting (after minor blade reshaping) and camping survival use than many other options.

    I also have one of the Estwing hatchets, but it has been retired to home/fireplace use due to the weight.
    It has been replaced by a ’40’s vintage wood handled hatchet from my grandfather. Lighter and more dynamic, it has been a part of cutting up nearly a hundred big game animals over the last 15+ years.

    I tried the ‘hawk years ago, and found it wanting in comparison to other choices for my needs and requirements then and now.

    Each of us has different needs, different areas we frequent, for some a machete or Hudson’s Bay axe is the first or most appropriate choice. I have used both heavily in different areas and still like them but don’t need them as much today.

    Make your choices on your needs.

    #6318
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Whirlibird,
    I actually don’t like carring a knife and a hatchet. For me a full size machete is to long and flexible. I still want the power to hack through stuff and have controllable cutting action. So I bought a gurka kuhri with a 12″ blade 1/4″ tang.

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    #6353
    Mr. Red
    Mr. Red
    Survivalist
    member7

    I need to get me one of those small Estwing hatchets. I have one of the larger camp axes and it’s a dream!

    Canadian Patriot. Becoming self-sufficient.

    #6402
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    I carry too many sharp pointy things.
    But I was also the camp butcher for 18 hunters for the last two decades and a spare sharp knife or three was always appreciated.

    The machete and axe were limited use items while in specific areas, but highly useful, in context.

    Trying to filet a fish with a hatchet?
    Trying to chop down a tree with a pocketknife?
    Choose the appropriate tool for the job.

    Kukri’s can be handy and useful, but like many compromise choices, don’t do either job as well as the original tool.
    Had one of the cold steel kukri’s, it didn’t cut/skin as well as a knife, didn’t chop like a hatchet, and certainly couldn’t hammer either.

    We each find what works for us, our needs and styles. In some respects, I’m going through this again, my kids are starting to hunt and camp, so we’re finding what works for them.

    #6792
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Mr Red I agree the Estwing product are made strong and they last forever. Also they are made in the U. S. A. with American steel.

    My Estwing hammers are great and the axes too. My new Estwing Tomahawk is so strong. Great products and they are priced right.

    #6798
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    I like my machete – it goes everywhere with me on the place. It’s smaller than the ones I used to use clearing brush and like that it has a saw on the other side. Comes in handy for lots of stuff.

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    #7217
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    I really need my Bruks splitting wedge. It has just the right design. For the amount of firewood I need for a winter I can’t imagine using anything but a chainsaw. But in general bowsaws are very useful. Up to 36″ they cut fast an with less effort than an axe. Tomahawks however are one thing I can never decide on. So many great designs. I like all of them.

    #7425
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Brulen,
    There is no substitute for a good chain saw. The manual labor it saves is enormous.

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