Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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  • #3657
    Mr. Red
    Mr. Red
    Survivalist
    member7

    I’ll admit, communication gear has been something I haven’t really worked toward, other than having a few radios. I had a couple FRS/GMRS radios a while back, but they sucked. So now, my most high tech form of long range communication is a whistle lol.

    When it comes to this more technical side of prepping, I’m in way over my head. It’s not that I don’t understand the electronics and such, but it’s the fact that I have no idea where to begin. So rather than just jumping into the deep in, I figured I’d test the waters here and ask for the advice of people how know what they’re talking about.

    So, where do I start, and with what?

    Red

    Canadian Patriot. Becoming self-sufficient.

    #3659
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    For us, Mr Red. We are using FRS/GMRS radios and CB’s as well. My father has the CB’s set up in all the cars and trucks along with the house and RV.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #3662
    Mr. Red
    Mr. Red
    Survivalist
    member7

    The problem for me is that since my town sits in around some pretty tall hills to out sides and north, and the ocean to our south, whatever frs radio I’ve used just can’t cut it if I were out in the woods. For here in town however they can work great.

    I’d like to try out some of those hand held CBs with a longer antenna. And of course, being in Newfoundland, it has to be as waterproof as possible lol.

    I’ve seen a lot about those little Baofeng radios, but Ham radio is a whole new beast for me.

    Canadian Patriot. Becoming self-sufficient.

    #3734
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Agreed Mr. Red. This is a subject that takes some investigating. I am surrounded by a ring of mountains/foothills. I have spent time to investigate different avenues, but out here because of all the farms – there is a lot of interference/traffic/use. I can easily hear if I wish what is going on more than a few places around me – and people are not always careful about what they say/talk about.

    An old farmer I met a few months ago told me that around here the people used to communicate using their old school/dinner bells because it was simple and could be heard from quite a distance. The farms changed the length of the ‘clapper’ I guess it is called to be distinctive. Basically they had a code they all had written down by the bell for the basics. It started because of fire concerns and grew from there. The first bell ring told them direction N, S, E, W (if you knew the sound of the bell you also knew who was sending the message) where the trouble was. The second bell ring told you what the trouble was: fire, accident, medical, or animal related. The third bell ring alerted to the level of the trouble/how much help needed.I wish I had recorded it. It was pretty simple yet tricky. The also used color cloths tied on things to pass information to each other, usually from some high point of barn but also at gates/along roads such as blue was river flooded ahead, and of course red on gate was danger – watch for the bull in the field!

    I too will be interested to hear others suggestions – especially simple ones I can handle.

    #4391
    Profile photo of skidmark
    skidmark
    Survivalist
    member2

    Ham radio is pretty easy. If I can get my Technician ticket just about anybody ought to be able to. And when SHTF most of the rules about how to behave when using amatur radio go out the window, per the FCC themselves.

    Your “emergency radio” (the one with the hand crank) probably has a few ham bands so you can listen and get a feel of what goes on. There are reliable handi-talkies that will not run you $100 each – or go to a Ham Fest and pick up some used ones for maybe 25% of MSRP. At the same time you can try out talking on the radio and ask lots of questions – like where are the repeaters in your areas and what frequencies they are on, as well as just how the heck do you program that handi-talkie you just bought.

    #9765
    Mr. Red
    Mr. Red
    Survivalist
    member7

    Sort of a bump to this thread, found this on Reddit (amazing source for all sorts of information; prepping stuff, this amateur radio business I’m just getting my feet wet in, DIY things, gardening, you name it they have it) and I figured it’s a great resource to share with those of you who, like me, see Comms in a SHTF world as being very important, yet have no idea where to begin

    http://www.reddit.com/r/amateurradio/wiki/index

    The sub-forum http://www.reddit.com/r/amateurradio/ is also a vast pool of knowledgeable individuals sharing what they know with people just starting.

    Canadian Patriot. Becoming self-sufficient.

    #19153
    Profile photo of Glockerman
    Glockerman
    Survivalist
    member2

    What are you looking to get out of comms? This will have a bearing on what you get. The inexpensive ‘blister pack’ radios are junk. They advertise great distances, but those distances are only possible if you were basically in outerspace. The VHF/UHF are very dependent on line-of-sight. You get greater bandwidth on V/Uhf antennas, typically covering the entire legal band. Not so with the HF stuff. Antenna’s have a very narrow freg range before you need to use an antenna tuner. HF antennas are also very large the lower in freq you go.

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