Viewing 4 posts - 16 through 19 (of 19 total)
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  • #15632
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    I had some outdoor first aid course a while ago and what stuck with me was the advice of a doctor who told me to simply gently massage the tick in a circular motion. Don’t drown it, don’t suffocate it (or it vomits into the wound). Just massage it with your finger in a circular motion until it lets go.

    Didn’t have a chance to try it yet but he was a sound guy and sweared by it for many years.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #15637
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Jay, I think that was my mistake. I could barely see this “seed tick” and scratched it off with my fingernail. Now the area has a raised bite site and surrounding rash. Probably “vomited” its toxin into the bite. I’m dousing it with iodide twice a day, and also using cortisone cream. So far (since Saturday) no other symptoms.

    I grew up in New Jersey (when it was rural) and we had dozens of juvenile dog ticks every day. Played in the woods and fields all summer. Never thought much about it, just pulled them off when we got home (checked our heads, usually). If it itched, we dabbed iodine on the site.

    But it seems diseases and their vectors are getting worse.

    #15638
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Yep Jay, as I said above, just use liquid soap and gently massage with piece cotton wool and tick should be out “on its own”.
    Do not use needles, nails, tweezers or anything similar especially if you are not skilled for that because you may do much more damage.

    #15653
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Guess old (ladies ;) ) need to learn new tricks… Survival depends on adaptability.

Viewing 4 posts - 16 through 19 (of 19 total)

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