Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 31 total)
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  • #11486
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Good stuff here…

    Download, save it, print out several copies for your group… got some seriously good stuff on defensive works, MG positions, fighting positions, trenchworks, bunkers, effects of different things on you defensive works, such as bullets, explosives, etc.. really, really good stuff.

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/97e3edt7lpvwmek/AFH10-222V14.pdf

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #11488
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Thank you Malgus, didn’t have this one.

    #11489
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Thanks Malgus, I’ve been needing something like this to study

    #11509
    Rowan McDirk
    Rowan McDirk
    Survivalist
    member3

    very interesting, thanks for sharing.

    #11510
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    wouldnt open for me , i’ll try again .

    #11733
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    Thanks for sharing Malgus. Will add to reading list. Good topic.

    #11797
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Thank you , it opened , good stuff !    looking at the barbed wire sections , The Germans in WW1 invented a silent corkscrew type barbed wire post , it has a bent over eye at the top to place a piece of wood to screw the bottom into the ground , worked so well that the allies copied it ………..last thing you wanted to do sneaking around in no mans land , is make noise repairing your barbed wire ;)

    #22201
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    “Building with Earthbags” – ran across this article today. Anyone tried this yet?
    Robin

    http://www.wildernesscollege.com/earthbags.html

    #22206
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Robin, it looks cool but I truly hope none of my friends ever asks me to help them do this! Closest have come was building a retaining wall at the pond inlet so we could do some work on the inlet without all the dirt/silt etc entering the pond. Was not any fun – but it worked. This before I met the neighbors with backhoes/bobcats.

    #22233
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    tweva,

    I learned a long time ago that I’m a fair hand with pioneer tools. I’m no John Henry, but I also learned to cut corners and to be expedient.

    We deployed, and our task was to build what is now termed “fighting positions”. In old parlance, the “foxhole”.

    After about 30 minutes of attacking the iron-hard ground, another unit was passing close to our position. Quickly, we passed the hat around and came up with about $50 USD. We flagged down the driver of a backhoe and offered him the $50 if he dug our holes for us. Not neatly, just make a deep hole.

    20 minutes later, our problem was solved. We had a half dozen holes we “neatened up” and made into fighting positions, saving us many hours of back-breaking work. Our sergeants were in awe that we could build such things so quickly… we never told them about the backhoe.

    Another time, different location, we had no such luck. We had to dig 4 foxholes around the crown of this particular hill. Well, it was really cold and, because there really wasn’t anything else to do, we would have one man on watch with the Machinegun and the other would be digging…

    Thing is, for some reason we didn’t go anywhere for the better part of a week and so to keep warm, we kept on digging… the whole week.

    By the end of that week, we had 4 reinforced fighting positions with overhead cover (wooden roofs with sandbags on top – can probably withstand a direct mortar hit), little hobo stoves made from scrounged cans, some crude furniture such as chairs, etc, in each fighting position. A slit trench 4 feet deep zig-zagged it’s way around the hilltop, linking the 4 fighting positions together in common, fluid defense. We even “borrowed” some field phones and daisy-chained them together – one phone per fighting position, lashed to the upright posts holding up the roofs…

    The whole thing was, of course, camouflaged. Not content with just cutting vegetation and decorating each position, we actually went out and dug up plants and bushes and such, then replanted them as camouflage so they wouldn’t wilt and die and turn a different color…

    It was so impressive, word got around. Our Battalion Commander took time off and came over to see it for himself. You could literally stand within 25 feet of it and not see it. We gave him the nickel tour and showed him everything. He was ecstatic that we could just make all this, whole cloth, with nothing but pioneer tools and stuff scrounged from the local dump… (actually, “liberated” from other units when they weren’t looking…). He took many photographs and remarked he hadn’t seen anything that elaborate since the end of the Vietnam War. We took it as high praise…

    Of course, we had to fill the whole mess back in when we finally moved – which was a real downer… we were proud as hell of those works. But, we had to do it.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #22234
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Great story Malgus, to bad you don’t have old photos of it.

    #22237
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    I might have some old photos squirreled away in a shoebox somewhere, but I wouldn’t even know where to begin to look… I can draw a pretty good picture, though.

    Thing is, you need to know where to “liberate” certain things. Once a day, we would hop in the HUMMV and drive the few miles to a chow tent for a hot meal. The cooks got their supplies delivered to them on wooden loading skids.

    Wooden loading skids are made of oak. Or, at least these were. GREAT building material. A couple bucks slipped to the Mess Daddy would get us leftover canned stuff. And the canned stuff made great hobo stoves once the cans were empty.

    And yes, the dump is an excellent place to scrounge stuff. Bits of wood. Sheet metal. Sometimes you really score. Last time I went to our dump to get rid of some storm debris, I found a half a bag of No. 6 nails someone threw away. Only reason I can see why they would dump it is because they were rusty…

    Field phones were the then-standard TA-312’s connected together with commo wire on a reel. Commo wire makes great building material too. No nails? Lash things together with commo wire.

    Here. A couple TA-312 field phones and reel of commo wire… they’re pretty damn tough and cheap for what they are… Runs on two D cell batteries, but they also run without them too…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

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    #22244
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    The Ta-312 look like a great phone idea for when the SHTF Malgus! Thank you brother for this info.

    #23960
    Profile photo of feral hobbit
    feral hobbit
    Survivalist
    member2

    The link has been disabled. Any way I can still get this?

    ...it is natural to man to indulge in the illusions of hope. We are apt to shut our eyes against a painful truth, and listen to the song of that siren till she transforms us into beasts...

    #23967
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    feral,

    Doing an online search using the name of the book yields many sources. Unfortunately, none are free. Easiest I’ve found is over at Amazon. Their Kindle Edition of this book is only a couple bucks… worth it. The print version is only a couple bucks more… I think it’s 12 dollars or something…

    Still worth it.

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1249127688/ref=ox_sc_imb_mini_detail?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

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