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  • #19334
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Some helpfull instructions from one of the best sources.

    http://www.husqvarna.com/us/support/working-with-chainsaws/filing-the-chain/

    After you sharpen the cutters be sure to cut the rakers to the proper height. If you don’t knock them down each time you sharpen, the rakers hold the cutters away from the surface of the wood. The saw will not cut well.

    #19345
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    That’s a good video for people to watch 74! If you are going to heat with wood, any plan to use chain saw or even electric you can recharge, you need to learn this. I’ve been cutting a lot of wood this summer as I have time and have to do this fairly often, doing almost ‘production’ cutting as we have been. If you go to a repair shop you can get an old chain from the mechanics to practice on first. It’s a tedious job but necessary.

    #19349
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I primarily heat with wood but have been buying my wood cut & delivered. I use my chain saws for routine work on my property with dead or fallen trees or low limbs. Taking the lazy way out I have been buying new chains rather than sharpen the old ones, but I save the old ones just in case the day comes that new ones aren’t available and the old ones have to be sharpened.

    #19350
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Thank you !

    #19369
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    The chains can be sharpened maybe 15 to 20 times depending on how far back you need to cut back eliminating nicks or worn edges. The end of the chain life is when the cutters are about 1/8th long front to back. If you are cutting all day it’s good to have a file along to re sharpen or have extra chains to swap out the dull chain. Just one old nail, wire staple, or stone can louse up your day without one.

    #19385
    Profile photo of Novus Ordo
    Novus Ordo
    Hunter
    rprepper

    74 – thanks. I’ve done my by hand a couple times, didn’t pay attention to the rakers. BTW, I was in Lowes Depot the other day and the guy there told me that they swapped out the chain with EVERY RENTAL every time! I couldn’t believe it, but yep, they do instead of bothering to sharpen. Might be a good source of “free” chains for those of you who want to make a friend and stock up.

    Arms discourage and keep the invader and plunderer in awe, and preserve order in the world as well as property... mischief would ensue were the law-abiding deprived of the use of them.
    - Thomas Paine

    #19387
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Novus Ordo,
    They probably do that for liability reasons. Someone injured with a old chain an employee modified has a greater chance of winning a suit than a new chain that is a factory item. Just because you sawed your leg half off doing something dumb, doesn’t mean it’s your fault in a legal battle. And I doubt they would let you anywhere near the old chains for the same reason.

    #19410
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Good video, learned a lot.

    #19457
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    I used to sharpen chains but then I got smart and started buying carbide. After all, I use carbide on table saw blades, jointer cutters, chop boxes, radial arm saw, why not chain saw. Saves time and they last a long time.

    #19632
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    Being able to sharpen a saw blade seems more of an art than a skill. I watch some of the old timer loggers sharpen theirs up where it cuts through a log like butter. Amazing what some of these guys can do with them.

    Good link. I love the resources on their site for both saws and axes.

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    #19660
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Brulen,

    I can buy a lot of chains and files for the $$ one carbide chain cost. I’m not sure it would be a good swap for me.

    #20254
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    You might be right 74. The only size I buy in carbide is 20″. If you switch between different blade lengths frequently it is probably cheaper to have a roll and make your own. And then there’s the trees people put nails in for whatever reasons. They eat chain. Fortunately what I cut is usually good. It isn’t dirty or real ancient from 150 yo farm houses. I’m a little worried about price increases, so I may be buying a few extra soon. I don’t see any reason carbide tips can’t be sharpened by hand with a diamond coated file. Or maybe its to much work. But a machine with a cutter attachment is sold by Stihl. If it doesn’t cost an arm $ leg.

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