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  • #48469
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    My annual physicals always include a blood test, though I now realize I have no idea what it is they are testing for. My doctor just tells me the blood work was normal. I take a multivitamin each day and just looked to see what it says. It says D rather than D2 or D3 so who knows what it is exactly. Yet another thing I know nothing about. I do get outside year round though. In the winter it is just my face exposed of course when I go for walks or am shoveling snow. Once it hits 50 in the spring I shift to shorts and teeshirts until it no longer hits 50 in the autumn so there’s a bit more skin exposed but I’m not one to lounge around pools in a bathing suit or work outside shirtless. I get chastised enough for being less than diligent with sunscreen without going shirtless too. Short sleeve teeshirts come out when it starts to hit 60.

    #48476
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    For the past few years I have asked for a copy of the lab results, and my doctor has very willingly had a copy made for me. You can then see exactly what’s tested for, where in the “normal” (reference) range you fit on each one, etc. It can occasionally be enlightening. Be aware that if you ask for the 25(OH)D test for Vitamin D, the low end of the “normal” range at most labs still shows what is now considered a deficiency. As per the link in the earlier post (to the Vitamin D Council web site), somewhere in the 80-90 range is quite good.

    It takes less sunlight than most people realize to get adequate vitamin D produced in your body, though with just a facial exposure and the low angle of the sun in the winter, you aren’t going to produce much if any. The above-linked article also has a good discussion about exposure and exposure times for adequate vitamin D. I wonder if I’m possibly above the normal range in the summer, actually, since it occurred to me that I’m at the high end of the normal range when I get my physical (generally in the middle of the winter). Even down south, I don’t get all that much sun exposure in the winter (more covering, also low sun angle compared to summer), yet I’m still in the high end of the range just with supplementation. You’re probably doing just fine in the summer, but a test is pretty definitive (I haven’t bothered with multiple tests per year as discussed in the article, though).

    As for multivitamins, choose very carefully. Most are somewhere between a waste of money and harmful. Check the vitamin A source – if it’s retanol, I won’t take it (nothing but beta-carotene in ours). There’s some evidence that the retanol form of vitamin A actually cuts vitamin D usage in the body (see this article at Vitamin D Council if interested). And the vitamin D type/source should be specified (as should ALL sources) if the supplement is even worth buying. The other one that gives a good clue as to the quality of the supplement is vitamin E. If the type starts with the letters “dl” as opposed to just “d,” dump it – it synthetic. The other clue is the spelling of the substance name – natural is spelled “tocopherol” while synthetic is “tocopheryl.” The cheapest vitamins (as in “cheap” with a strong sarcastic sound) have dl-alpha-tocopheryl, not d-alpha-tocopherol (the natural form).

    #48480
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    GS the test I saw on Amazon was $38. I generally don’t get tested for anything. But I take MSM on a pretty regular basis. I can’t remember the last physical I had. I haven’t taken antibiotics or any other prescription except for a root canal. I consider Ny such an unfriendly gun state I don’t want any medical record or even a physical here. But I do take d and c vitamins occasionally if I’m working extra hard or the stress level is high. Since the extended family divorce however my stress has gone way down. Getting those big headed libs out of my life has made me feel much better. I used to think I had seasonal depression and I increased my d intake to compensate. Lol

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 3 months ago by Profile photo of Brulen Brulen.
    #48485
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    Brulen, LOL! I understand more than you know. I escaped from NY many years ago. It took forever to convince them that I really did not owe taxes in NY even though I followed every step outlined by JAG when I went into the Air Force to change my state residency. A fellow officer and college buddy of mine at the time went through the same hassle, and his final income tax check to NY was made out to the order of “Rocky’s Welfare State” (which certainly dates us). They cashed it without comment, believe it or not! When I see the number of products and services not offered in NY, I just shake my head and am thankful to have gotten out when I did. NY and California shouldn’t even qualify as part of the United States (though it’s getting more and more questionable if any states do anymore, thus my belief the the constitutional republic exists on paper only, and that paper runs the risk of being tucked away out of public view in the not-too-distant future as well).

    In all seriousness, having been in the military medical system for more than two decades, including the transition to electronic records, I absolutely concur with having as little as possible visible to “them” (government, not just the military – it’s all the same). Once it’s there, it’s ALWAYS there, and the burden of correction is entirely on you, and you’ll lose. I am firmly convinced that they will use medical records (they actually already are, for that matter) to disqualify people from gun ownership. And though we haven’t seen much of it yet, what will be happening more and more is that those living in the same household will ALSO be effectively prohibited from owning a weapon, because the restricted person cannot have any access, regardless of whether they exercise it or not. The only place where I’ve really seen that enforced is with some Lautenberg Amendment cases, but it’s coming – I have zero doubt.

    Oh well – this thread is for food safety, so I’ll at least get back to an ingredient in some canned foods (though it’s very hard to get any significant amount of vitamin D in food).

    Vitamin D in the winter is a good idea regardless of S.A.D. or any other reason. As one of the links above said, if your shadow is longer than you are, your body isn’t making any vitamin D. And particularly in the winter, 5000 IU won’t hurt virtually anyone (only those with extremely rare and unique abnormalities). I’ve been taking that daily for a number of years, and have yet to have a test come back above the top end of the reference range. But if your body is relatively normal and healthy, and you are reasonably exposed frequently in the summer, you probably don’t need any vitamin D supplementation anyway (except winter).

    My hat’s off to you on your avoidance of prescription meds. I’m now off ALL previous meds, and healthier (and happier) overall than I was 10 (or even five) years ago – just older and in poorer shape (my own fault – no excuse). We’re trying to get away from canned foods more and more, except for vacuum packed freeze dried or dehydrated foods, and wanting to grow more and more of our own veggies. We’ve considered a future possible purchase of a home freeze dryer, but don’t know if it’d be cost-effective (VERY expensive), plus the space it requires is considerable, along with the noise, supposedly. Don’t know on that. But our store-bought canned goods storage is FAR less than prior years, and now at a relatively minimal level.

    Keep on keepin’-on with your avoidance of medical documentation to the maximum extent prudent and possible. If I could tell some of the things I know from direct, ongoing experience, it would knock peoples’ socks off. It’s awful what’s documented on virtually all of us, and beyond awful how many people have easy access to it. Privacy? PFFFFT! Forget that! It all started big time with George W’s HIPAA point man, Tommy Thompson, but if Hillary had had her way with Hillary Care, it would have come even earlier. Anyone who thinks HIPAA has anything to do with privacy, except on the lying surface, is naive beyond description. I suggest to people that they do an MIB check (used to stand for Medical Information Bureau, but I think it’s simply going by its initials anymore, like IBM). It’s essentially like the credit bureau for the insurance industries, where they keep your medical history on file for any medical or life insurance company to check if you apply for a policy. Just like the credit bureaus, everyone is allowed a free copy of their MIB report (I think annually). It may shock you wnat you find out they have on file for you – I know it sure did me, as well as my doctor when I showed him what came out of my routine physical, IN HIS OFFICE, and by HIM. I had an absolutely clean bill of health – but you wouldn’t have known it by what my MIB report showed a few years back! Don’t trust the with your medical information to the absolute maximum extent of your capability (and it ain’t just NY where one has to be concerned – NY is just a more immediate concern, while the rest of the nation “catches up”). As I said, I know from long professional experience, from inside Uncle’s medical system. I could write a book, but half the people wouldn’t believe it, and I’d be worried for my own health and welfare if I did. Whistle blowers are like a lot of drugs. They don’t stay around a long time, and are quickly eliminated.

    #48488
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    My apologies for thread drift, but I just wanted to note that GS is right about medical records. Last year at age 62 I applied for a life insurance policy to replace one I had at work. I did it through my insurance agent of 30 years or so. He came back with a question from the life insurance company wanting more information on a surgery I had when I was 11 years old.

    #48515
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Read this article Drug Expiration Dates — Do They Mean Anything?

    http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/drug-expiration-dates-do-they-mean-anything

    “Most of what is known about drug expiration dates comes from a study conducted by the Food and Drug Administration at the request of the military. With a large and expensive stockpile of drugs, the military faced tossing out and replacing its drugs every few years. What they found from the study is 90% of more than 100 drugs, both prescription and over-the-counter, were perfectly good to use even 15 years after the expiration date.”

    #48516
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Interesting article, especially coming from Harvard, and not a great surprise though I wish it has gone into more detail.

    #48518
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    I wish it has gone into more detail.

    I concur fully. The devil is in the details, as they say. One can purchase doxycycline without prescription for pets, and keep it for times when meds may not be available. It treats some bacterial infections including anthrax specifically (as well as Lyme disease, malaria, and certain STDs). And the production standards for veterinary medicines are high enough that they normally can be used by humans as well. HOWEVER – that 10% mentioned by the Harvard article is where things can break down quickly. The tetracycline family (of which doxycycline is one) can cause liver damage if it’s expired. Liver damage can also occur with in-date doxycycline, but apparently that accelerates dramatically with improperly stored and/or longer term expired batches.

    A good article somewhat from our perspective is:

    http://www.thesurvivaldoctor.com/2015/08/05/expired-antibiotics/

    Note the “Part 1″ of the article linked at the top of this article. It discusses antibiotics for fish. Yes, you can find antibiotics in pet stores for fish, but those for fish are NOT FDA certified or regulated. Those for warm-blooded animals are (though still with some differences in standards).

    #48521
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Our local sheriff drug take back day here is Saturday. Get rid of your old prescriptions, no questions asked. Of course it’s all run by the DEA. Last September they took in state or nation wide 350 tons. Overall in the ten previous events they’ve taken back a whopping …. 5.5 million pounds of prescription drugs. Sounds like drug recycling could be a very profitable business.

    If anyone reads America Survival Guide March vol 5 issue 9 there was an article on drug longevity by Joe Alton MD. http://www.doomandbloom.net

    Drug expiration dates and survival.

    #48522
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Good article GS. I printed it out to save. Brulen, I haven’t found that particular article yet but I will say there looks to be a lot of good stuff on that site. Thanks.

    #48523
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    MB, here’s a link that pulls up several articles on that site. However, I’m not sure much new information is there from other articles I’ve seen, though I did not that there was no precaution about the tetracycline family (which includes Doxycycline). Still, good info from what I read, and what appears to be a very good site overall that I’ve not seen before.

    https://www.doomandbloom.net/?s=drug+expiration

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