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  • #1828
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Your experience with using candles (or candles stoves ,candle burners, candle heathers…)for emergency heating and cooking. What setup is best, best size (for BOB, for home etc.) and similar?

    #2366
    Profile photo of sootsme
    sootsme
    Survivalist
    member1

    I’d use a little bit of my candles to start my fires, probably in a “rocket stove” (Google it, several videos on YouTube), which you can do as simple as a hole in the ground, or made from scrap cans, or cinder blocks, for heat and/or cooking. Uses very little fuel to very good effect.

    #2401
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Thanks Sootsme.

    #3207
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    I make my own candles.

    Tried the dip method. Also used molds (single and gang molds). Tried beeswax, paraffin wax and various combinations. Having candles around is downright handy.

    Best combination I’ve found so far is a 50/50 mix of beeswax and paraffin wax, poured into a 6″x1″ mold. The 6×1 seems to balance weight and longevity pretty well. You have to age them, though. Believe it or not, if you age a poured candle about 6 months, it will last longer. Half a dozen of them weigh almost nothing, but be advised that mice LOVE to chew on beeswax candles, so package them accordingly.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #3209
    Profile photo of handman
    handman
    Survivalist
    member1

    I don’t like candle heaters. I don’t think they put out much heat. I made one and use five tea lights. I check on it after one hour. It was pretty worthless. I think people will do better with hot hands warmers that are cheap and do a better job.

    #3225
    Mr. Red
    Mr. Red
    Survivalist
    member7

    I remember, years and years back, when I was Wee Mr. Red, my cousin and I were at my Aunt an Uncles cabin, and all we had to cook with was a few of those little tea light candles (They never trusted us to use the propane stove, rightfully so I might at. Wonder they even let us out of their sight haha). You’d be amazed as to how well 3-4 of those candles can make suitably warm water for tea, and warm up beans lol.

    We’ve got a few hundred of those little bad boys now. Quite a great piece of kit for the home/cabin/shed.

    Canadian Patriot. Becoming self-sufficient.

    #3249
    Profile photo of lci115lewis
    lci115lewis
    Survivalist
    member3

    Well my experience is just from weekend camping while doing various reenacting, but having a candle stub burning in the socket ring of an American Civil War bayonet for a hour or so does wonders for taking the chill off of a 6×9 foot canvas A tent at night. Those little brass backpackers candle lanterns are also pretty good at the same thing, Our big 12×16 foot double bell wedge pavilion uses up to 4 candle lanterns and if we are camping when it will be getting more than nippy at night we also use a catalytic propane space heater after we extinguish the candles, that was with My wife and I plus 2 little kids, the same group crammed into the “little” A tent and we had no safe place for the candle lanterns so we just used a lot of wool blankets and snuggled up.

    Never tried to cook over a candle, even when roughing it at ACW events there was still a communal fire pit, and at events when we or the group we were camping with were NOT roughing it, things were almost posh. Biggest kitchen setup I have been involved with was for a demo center at a big medieval week long event, 4 good sized mud brick ovens a fire pit and a place we dumped the coals from the ovens where you could heat water or do some slow baking. Took us about 16 hours to get the whole kitchen setup built and then we had to fire the ovens overnight to harden them. A week later we had to use sledge hammers to break up the mud shell so we could load the bricks back onto a trailer. Most elaborate kitchen I saw at an event had 2 full gas ovens with range tops that had been setup to run from 20 Lb propane cylinders, each one went through at least one tank a day, and they only had 15-20 people to feed, we fed more people than that better food, cheaper and faster with 2 2 burner Coleman stoves and 1 mud brick oven.

    OK, did anyone spot the point to my digression into cooking? I thought I had one when I started, but now I have no idea if I made a point or not. Thank goodness that it is time to head home, 45 minutes to decompress and vegetate with an eBook while riding the bus :)

    Rob

    #3259
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    @ Rob (lci115lewis)

    Ever hear of a “mucket”? I’ve always wanted one, and I think that if someone would make them in stainless steel, they’d be a smash hit with the prepper community… even better, add in some old school percolator coffee pot parts and it would do everything…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

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    #3432
    Profile photo of lci115lewis
    lci115lewis
    Survivalist
    member3

    I just happen to have a stainless steel one on the shelf in my bedroom, many civil war suttlers carry them. If I didn’t already have a couple of sets of British mess tins, I would have that in my bug out kit for a lot of the cooking chores. I had made good use of a carbon steel mug the same size as most muckets for a number of years, until it was getting pretty well beat up from being landed on too many times when I “died”, I retired it once the handle seperated at the bottom. A little rice, some dried beef and a carrot or two makes a pretty decent campfire stew in one of those, man I think I need to find the recipie again and do another batch of dried beef, the first batch I ever made was over dried, had to shave it off with a knife, but a chunk lived in my haversack for over a year and the only change was it getting smaller with use.

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