Viewing 11 posts - 16 through 26 (of 26 total)
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  • #23168
    Profile photo of Pheonix
    Pheonix
    Survivalist
    member5

    I have been through thunderstorms under a 8’x10′ tarps strung between two trees about 3′ above the ground and staked down tight.

    I stayed dry and all the guys in the fancy tents woke up to discover the tents make a great swimming pool and will hold 6″ of water in with no problem.

    #23169
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Pheonix,
    Any tent that can trap 6″ of water can also keep it out. Tenting is about chosing a good site and moving the water away from the tent. If the canopy leaks well just forget it.

    #23178
    Profile photo of Pheonix
    Pheonix
    Survivalist
    member5

    It was when I was in the national guard. They did not put much thought into where they put their tents. I had no tent and was not real fond of camping too close to my unit since I snored loud and they like to mess with me while I slept because of it. You would think the first time I almost gutted one of them like a fish in my sleep when they were messing with me they would have learned to leave me alone. Anyhow, I walked a ways into the woods and set up on high ground with a good stand of trees around me to act as a wind break. I set up my cot with metal folding chairs next to it. I set up my tarp just high enough to clear the chairs and tied the edges down about 12″ off the ground.

    I had a battery operated fan that would keep mosquitoes off me and my clothes and boots went inside plastic bags on the seats of the chairs.

    The next day I was rested and dry and most of the rest of my unit was wet, tired and cranky.

    #23202
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Pheonix, You made good choices, and bring up another good topic. Campming in wooded areas. Camping in a forest is one of the best experiences you can have. However in bad weather with strong winds it adds a new level of danger from falling limbs and trees. I have been forced out of the woods twice because so many of the trees had dead wood in the air it was scary listening to the breaking and falling tree limbs.

    #23400
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    So much for setting up a hammock between two trees like Mick Dodge. LoL I wonder what a hammock feels like in an earthquake. Probably better than sleeping on the ground thru a bunch of aftershocks. Heavy rain – much better, fersure.

    #25285
    Profile photo of RSSwizard
    RSSwizard
    Survivalist
    member3

    To keep out pest animals and discourage their presence you might want to get some Chicken Wire. Cheap lockable trunks from walmart for $20-30 each are also generally secure against pest animals even if they are made of plastic so its a good place to put food or other things that might smell (if they try to chew on it, they dont have a good edge to bite down on and they just end up clawing at it and walking off). Those can usually be locked too, but beware they wont keep out mold or insects.

    (the kind of pest animals im talking about are Raccoons, Possums, and Skunks, which you do not want anywhere near your tent)

    Also if you want to make a somewhat more permanent camp you can build a rudimentary structure out of Shipping Pallet pieces. You can put a wooden pole or branch through them to rienforce them and attach them to each other. You can still put a Tent under it but it makes a much more sturdy overhead structure to protect from rain or snow or falling branches. You put a tarp over it, of course, so this multiplies the effectiveness of a lean-to.

    You dont have to make them as extensive as the ones in the google pictures but I think you get the idea. Beware that they’re heavier than they look if you’re having to pack them in somewhere.

    >> If you are having to locate your tent in some place which is at the base of a hill or next to a raised area, you may not be immediately aware of the risk of Flooding. Even if you only get 1 inch of standing water there because its only a slight dip, that can spell trouble for having your tent there (even if its waterproof the cold water will cause condensation on the inside and you will still get flooded).

    Using Shipping Pallets and some logs and branches you can still put your Tent in that area, like for example if it is a good hidden place and you really just want to put it there. Lay the logs down and put down a 2 x 2 square of Shipping Pallets (that should give you about an 8′ footprint), adjust the logs or branches under them so that they are as flat as possible. Adding stones might be a good idea too if those are available. Then put the Tent on top of that. You can probably buy yourself as much as 8 inches to 1 foot of clearance off of the ground.

    Basically this is like building a house on stilts. Minor flooding of the type I described wont get in your tent, and even though it will suck when you go to leave your tent (having to put your boots down in the water) at least home will stay dry.

    I thought of this idea after a couple other homeless people put their tent at the bottom of a small incline next to a hill. Ive seen that area flood before and I warned them about it, but next time it rained the ground was wet there and they had to take off. There were three downed trees with plenty of branches, and if they had something flat to get their tents off the ground they could have stayed there.

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    #25407
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>sledjockey wrote:</div>I am actually thinking about doing something modular onto my current flat bed trailer. I would have to do a spring/shackle inversion and put on some bigger tires, but it would be worth it in the long run to have something as versatile as a flat bed/off road camper/cargo trailer/boat and atv/motorcycle hauler with only the need to swap out the modules on top. Been thinking about it for a while…… Oh if I only had the time I need to finish all these projects!

    Here’s a thought.

    Some years ago, okay decades, I helped build a do it yourself portable house. Or more accurately, a Yurt.

    A friend had a spare flatbed trailer he was putting to use as his bugout trailer. He couldn’t afford a travel trailer but had enough stuff to make a heck of a rollout rig.

    We talked about it for a while and I oulled out a back issue of American Survival Guide (April 1988), featuring a home built yurt, and that was the answer.

    We built the lattice work walls over a week in the evenings, building it in sections so he and his wife could put it up while the 4 kids amused themselves.
    We actually built a floor in sections so you could get off the ground and stay warm and comfortable in winter or the mud season.
    A local tent and awning shop made the covers for the walls and the roof. It was the most expensive part of the mess.

    With a small wood stove installed, it was comfortable at 0 F, we had opportunity to try it out several times.

    During a particularly bad couple of months, they actually lived in the yurt out in the sticks.

    We installed a 275 gallon water tank on the trailer, added locking storage lockers and more to it. When all said and done it had 2 100 lb propane cylinders for the stove, a shower stall that assembled off the side, a fold down table that could be removed and installed in the yurt, and more.

    Funny thing, just last month I was thinking again about building my own version of the trailer and the yurt. I called him up and he’s building another nearly identical rig, seems his eldest and her husband are wildlife biologists and spend months in the field. He’s making them a newer version with solar panels and more.
    The biggest difference? Hes using an enclosed trailer this time.

    But the yurt itself can be made fairly cheaply so long as you plan it carefully and do most of the work yourself.

    Check the web for home built versions and the commercial versions for ideas.

    #25425
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    What comes to mind reading your post Whirlibird is that for someone who has family or friends in a decent bug out location, but with a home not big enough for added guests, that putting a yurt on the property might be a workable solution.

    #25430
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    It is, and because it’s not permanent, like a tent, it doesn’t fall under building codes and such.

    And to make it more livable in the winter, you just add insulation.

    #25773
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    It would where I’m located. Much easier to have a small 20-30 foot trailer.

    #25776
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>Brulen wrote:</div>It would where I’m located. Much easier to have a small 20-30 foot trailer.

    Depends on how much gear and how many people you are dealing with.

    My old trailer, long gone now was fine for me and the dog.
    Now with three kids, the wife and the dogs, not a chance on the smaller units. Too much gear alone, let alone food, etc.

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