Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #16366
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    What do you consider best building materials that have both thermal and SHFT protection when choosing building materials for a location

    Using shipping containers
    inside wood/drywall
    14 gauge or ..075 inch thick steel wall
    then 6 inches of spray foam (basf)
    dressed local rock 6 inches thick
    sheet metal roof 12 gauge

    was thinking of using straw bale instead of foam does anyone have experience with straw bale construction?

    #16372
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Straw bale is highly effective, even without the container.
    Where we used to live there were a number of bale buildings that were over a hundred years old and still standing fine.

    Stacked and braced correctly, its not only highly insulative but still fairly inexpensive.

    The last outbuilding I helped build cost just a few thousand, and that was mostly the steel framework and roof sheets.

    Putting a thicker layer of concrete and mesh on the outside would provide a greater ballistic protection, yet cost less than the container.

    Much depends on what trouble you are expecting or are prepping for.

    Depending on where you are, adobe and rammed earth may also offer a fairly inexpensive construction style.

    A friend built his house with cinderblocks, two layers with rammed sand between them. The house was heated with the appliances most of the time, it was that efficient. The porch was also a heat sink for the winter months and would keep the temp jnside high enough that you could wear shorts in January. In Colorado.

    Again, much depends on what you aee planning for.

    #16373
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    namelus, How many shipping containers? In a SHTF were everyone is inside you need a bathroom so you need to build a septic tank. Also you need one or two air supply with filters. Need water tanks to store your water. For cooking I like gas tanks in the ground. Also need to have an other way out of the shopping containers.

    The sheet metal roofing needs to go on an 20 to 30 degree angle so the rain or snow goes down.
    I would do 12 inches of rock, cement them down.

    The 6 inch foam is very good and adding 14 gauge thick steel walls is also very good. On the inside wood is good but try not to use to much drywall. Maybe buy Durock and plaster it like an outside of a house this is water proof so if water gets in there will be no problems. Also Durock is stronger.

    #16374
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    I was looking for a product that would be easy to use but would provide both strength and be cost effective and I ran across these two sites:

    http://www.concretecanvas.com/

    http://concretecloth.milliken.com/Pages/home.aspx

    I was thinking or straw bale with the concrete cloth on the inside.
    Still working on idea for roof.
    Robin

    #16377
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Robin this is one great option were you use concrete bags http://mexico.solarhaven.org/earthbag-solarhaven2.html

    more links,

    http://www.greenhomebuilding.com/earthbag.htm

    Here is an article on the concrete cloth, http://www.greenprophet.com/2012/08/buildings-in-a-bag-can-instantly-aid-middle-east-refugees/

    I like the concrete bags as the walls then add the cloth over them and plaster the cloth. The concrete bags will stop all gun ammo out there.

    #16391
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    Whirlibird i was looking at 30+ 40 foot containers for inside space as well as using them to create larger box structures like barns/ garages from them.

    Freedom there is a connected structure for bathrooms using composting toilets single wet wall for kitchen and bathroom /laundry area

    non of containers are for below ground as that is structurally unsafe.

    Robin for roofing http://www.rheinzink.com/en/start/ if you can budget it it is expensive but lasts for over 100 years with warantee

    #16392
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Building the SB home around the container would provide quite a heavily insulated building.

    Just outside of town near me, there’s a barn that utilizes 52′ containers as part of the walls/storage.
    I’ll try and get a picture for ideas. There’s another along the highway, but it’s too hard to get a pic of that one.
    But think of the old horse barns where the horse stalls were on the sides on the long dimension.
    The containers are located there.

    The other one, has two containers stacked as the side walls along both long walls/sides.

    #16397
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    For thermal insulation you can look at mixing hollow glass microspheres with your paint. Here in SA they sell different variations in 40 kg bags.

    #16398
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Quick google seach .. What some companies are doing with hollow glass micropheres : ‘a syntactic foam product for blast mitigation. “There are millions of microballoons in one square inch of syntactic foam, and at each interface there is an event that dissipates the energy of a blast,” explains Gladysz. He believes this makes syntactic foams ideal for production of moldable protective panels that absorb and dissipate blast energy rather than just transmit and reflect blast effects.

    Key applications for antiblast products include lightweight armor plating for military vehicles, lightweight helmet covers, flak jacket inserts and protective composite walls, doors and other structures.’ Link http://www.compositesworld.com/articles/microspheres-fillers-filled-with-possibilities

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