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  • #25753
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    This years bug season began on exactly June first. Clouds of Mos came out of no where and ate my poor pooch alive. I was wearing long sleeves and pants, or as we Hillbilly’s call them, shirt pants. Civilized folk call them overalls.

    I did have a bug mask, unfortunately they where no good for no see ems, (biting midges i think?). Now they really at the dog, he would be covered in them, and then when we sheltered they would fly off fat and get stuck to the windows bug tape. Hundreds of them.

    Its the no see ems that sucked the worst, they started a mid June. I had to velcro seal my legs where my socks met my overalls, as well as the sleeves of my arms. I did not do that for my neck tho. My first bug mask was not good enough had to switch to a finer mesh. It gets very hot in it, some days it was 105.

    Past that, I would say the coolest day was the day of flying beetles. Huge jaws. I tell you i have never stripped out of my overalls so fast in my life. Bright red or orange ones as well.

    Huge black jackets, and Ive had the run put on me by yellow jackets more than once. They seem to like bridges, all of them.

    Very few honey bees :( Actually the only honey bees I’ve spotted where in the continental divide.

    Late season came the sand flies. That was hell, but it didn’t last to long.

    No see ems and sand flies are tenacious little buggars.

    4 cans of bug spray used total.

    That’s about it, fall is awesome :D

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #25758
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    For me this year was very low on mosquitos which are the only real nuisance bug we have around here. Spring was wetter than normal which usually means prodigious amounts of mosquitos but the population was low all season. I think what happened was the longer than normal winter we had killed them off, especially if they hatched at the normal time but encountered freezing temps still. Usually if I go out early in the morning the mosquitos are all over me but not this year. In the evening I wasn’t being driven into the house to get away from mosquitos. I’m all for longer winters if this is what we get in return.

    #25760
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Here

    2010 was the first invasion of the ‘stink bug’ – marmorated something or other from China that has been decimating fruit and other crops in PA and now south since the late ‘0’s – from China

    20122 was the year of ticks – the Lyme disease kind and others in spades -everywhere youwent- even dropping from trees. Thick with them

    2012 was the invasion of the Asian ladybug

    2013 was the invasion of the ‘moth’ and larvae ‘bugs’ – cutworms, corn borers and the like in huge numbers

    2014 has been an invasion of Japanese beetles in numbers I have never seen before in all my years of gardening and despite regular treatments of Milky Spore. Cherry trees went first, then apples….and strangeky the knockout roses still bloom.

    Gosh knows the meaning behind the universe’s choice of ‘pest of the year’!

    #25764
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    tweva, you had a colder than normal winter down there I think but maybe it wasn’t cold enough. To kill back bugs it needs to get cold enough to freeze the ground solid beneath the leafy forest floor which otherwise insulates the bugs from the cold. Frosty mornings and maybe the lawn area freezing solid isn’t enough.

    The deer ticks that carry lyme disease are endemic here but an extra cold winter will knock back their populations too. Because it is endemic here everyone knows people who have or have had lyme disease. The best course of action is to not get infected in the first place. My approach is to always take a shower and put on clean clothes after working outside just in case I picked up one. A friend swears by using a lot of garlic in his food. Those of you who live in areas where it is not endemic yet should be aware of the symptoms. It is easily cured if caught early on, and almost impossible to cure if not. One of my son’s best friends is in pretty bad shape at this time because it wasn’t caught early. Note that doctors who are expert in treating lyme disease are few and far between and that frequently the initial test results are false negatives. For those not familiar with deer ticks, they are very tiny, much smaller than what many think of when they think of ticks.

    #25770
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    I keep getting deer ticks here in Oklahoma and nearby Arkansas. Prevalent in the brush, and also when cleaning game. Had a few after cleaning some squirrels we shot. Keep after them…not easy to spot.

    Chiggers too. Hate ‘em. Itchy welts forever. The “nail polish” cures etc don’t work.

    Speaking of mosquitoes, I am so thankful we are no longer in Alaska. As soon as the snow began to melt, out they came. Hibernated between the logs of our cabin, I think. Not just swarms but black clouds of them, mingled with black flies at times. Fortunately they don’t carry disease yet–but the nasty little poisonous ones in India are deadly vectors of unnumbered diseases.

    Come to think of it, I bet Ebola can be carried by them. Don’t care what the CDC says. If one sucks the blood of an infected person, then comes cruising over to you, its mouth parts can certainly be tainted with virus. Make sure you have mosquito nets if camping…

    #25771
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    Wish we could get a good freeze here actually. The pine beetle is killing the forest. Fuel load is huge.

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #25782
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Mosquitoes is the problem here in South Florida but this summer was not a bad summer for mosquitoes. Not many other bags this year here.

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