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  • #5916
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Our spring cattle came this morning (8) – we keep them on grass through late fall. Then they get sent to auction. One gets processed (not by me) for meat. A friend was here, watching and about got nailed a couple of times by being in the wrong place at the wrong time as they were being unloaded. Thought this might help if you plan to bug out through countryside that might have cattle around you might have to deal with.

    Cattle aren’t normally aggressive. (I mean females and neutered males) Bulls are flat out dangerous. Just because a cow has horns doesn’t mean it is a bull. Not all bulls have horns.
    If cattle feel threatened or get spooked they will often, as a herd, charge or run. They can easily hurt you either because they are trying to protect their calf, because they are checking out something/are curious, or something spooked or scared them and they are running away. They are herd animals. Once one starts moving they all seem to in a big pack. They can seriously hurt or kill you – especially when running as a herd and you are in their way, or if they feel you are a threat to their calf.
    If you must travel through a place where cattle are grazing use your brain. There might be a bull in there with them. Stay near a fence you can jump over even if it makes for a longer journey!
    Hopefully you don’t have a dog with you as you bug out. Cows don’t see all that well in my opinion and I don’t think they can always tell if what they are seeing at a distance is a wolf/coyote and not your dog. The only other thing I’d say if you are bugging out through a cow pasture with a dog is – leash it; but if cattle start to herd up and trot/run towards you – let the dog go. He’ll usually out run them; and you’ll be safer too.
    Anyway, if you see little babies (calves) in the area STOP! Be careful now. A normally quiet cow can become pretty mean if she thinks you are a danger to her baby! Do NOT get between any calves and their mothers. Stay WELL away. If you see a calf by itself – stay away – don’t go anywhere near it. Believe me – Mom is somewhere nearby! Walk well away on the edges, quiet, confident and SLOW. Quiet. Go around the herd. Do not try and go through the herd – even if it looks like there’s lots of open space between one group and another. Believe me – cows can RUN! From the other side of the fence I find few things funnier then big a** cows running full tilt!
    Often, but by no means always….if you see a field of cows with lots of babies, there isn’t a bull in there with them. He’s off somewhere else. If you don’t seem to see a lot of babies – just always assume there might be a bull in there somewhere (he’s in there to breed the cows). Remember not all bulls have horns and not all cattle with horns are bulls. Look towards the rear between their legs – you’ll know. Also, bulls tend to have thicker, heavier necks. When in doubt? Get the heck out! That’s my motto anyway. Bulls can turn on a dime and out run any human. If you hear snorting, particularly a series of loud, short snorts; , or see what you think is just a cow pawing the ground, turning sideways towards you, get the hell away. Go jump over a fence, climb a tree. I don’t know how to stop a bull/deal with one coming at me. Maybe someone on here does. But even if they do, I know I’d still run and jump the fence as fast as possible.

    Watch one of my favorite videos to see how cattle react/move ….it’s hilarious to. Best to always know what’s out there! (PS I don’t see any bulls in the herd – watch again and see if you can see any!) Ok – lunch over – back to work!

    #5944
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    I grew up in rural Arizona , ranchers all over the place , back in the day , they were very cool , they didnt mind you being on their land ( we were just kids anyway ) , and just told us what direction not to shoot , because of the cattle ………now because of all the wetbacks and drug runners , that has changed . But anyway , cattle are dumb , docile creatures , used to humans ……………Bulls on the other hand are a different story , they will go after you , with no hesitation ! This will most likely be a very rare occurrence , because they are segregated from the cattle by the Rancher , they are only used for breeding , and even then , its very controlled . You will most likely only find a bull in a pen , close to one of the ranch buildings ….not roaming freely like the rest of the cattle ………….now a day , breeding is done artificially in many cases ……its just more efficient for the modern Rancher . If they still do it the old fashion way , its not unusual for one Rancher to own a bull , and several other Ranchers renting it ………this makes your chances of running into one even that much less .

    #5957
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Hi Tolik! I am the first one to tell you I am not a seasoned cattle rancher/farmer. Only 5 years. But here on the east coast, in areas where the acreage cattle are kept on is measured, usually at most, double and triple digits (not by the thousands), many every-day, regular farmers (not breeding for high dollar progeny) still do put the bull out with the cows in a field. More so now in this economy. The fees for artificial insemination are getting outrageous. Around here typical is 100 acres max, as a norm – 25-50 or less.

    With the cattle shortage (lowest number of head in this country since the mid-fifties) farmers around here are doing everything to save a buck and make even bigger profits. Yeah! Letting nature take its course is one of them. The city folk that make their way out here the last few years are often deciding to ‘oh lets have a romantic picnic in that pretty field’. They don’t even think about it being someone’s property …it’s just ‘pretty’ so they ‘should’ be allowed to ‘enjoy’ it. Right. Last year around here in our county in six months, 6 people were injured and one died…’death by cow’. Stupid a** people. Probably waved their $200 picnic table cloth at them and the lady in her heels couldn’t get out of the way of the herd fast enough.

    I think it depends on where it is you are locating. In the US, west of the MS most cattle farms equals more acreage (always small holders to consider of course. Here in the east it is usually different.

    Thank you so much for sharing that from your experience. I hadn’t thought about it in a more overall terms for people here in this country. See? Love it. You learn so much already from people on here.

    #5964
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Yeah , we need more land out here to equal the small areas you have , because our land quality is so poor , and the low amount of rainfall in comparison .

    #5975
    Hannah
    Hannah
    Survivalist
    member6

    Great advice!!
    I lived on a farm for a year as a kid and learned to avoid the bulls for the reason stated above. Never consider it for bugging out!
    Hannah

    #5981
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Yeah Tolik…at the moment (changes on nature’s whim) …we got the grass! (ah, usually…am feeding the newbies round bales right now until grass really comes in – they are all ‘preggers’ BTW – yah! so God willing 15 go to auction in late fall/early winter – but if drought this summer who knows? -And, feed them grain/corn we raised here on the farm for a month or so before they leave.)….. maybe forget quality…. but ‘any’ beef right now?… go to the grocery store. Story told.if you think about it.

    #5988
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    The animal I would be worried about has 2 legs and a gun watchin those cows.

    #5991
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Oh 1974t150v you are so droll – thanks for the chuckle! (Uhhh, but to me, this is serious business ’cause with ‘land use’ the deduction the cattle provide is well worth learning about. In my county, finally, this year, my property taxes will be cut by more than half…because of these beautiful bovines.That’s a difference of $5790/yr to me . ‘Yes sir, thank you very much’!

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