Viewing 14 posts - 16 through 29 (of 29 total)
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  • #11968
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Malgus – Pretty much what I have packed in a rucksack.

    Tolik – Same as you, almost. If it is winter I pack light clothes in a expanding zippered nylon laundry bag. It can expand to hold almost all clothes in a closet but I do not use it that large. I also have, guess you could call them “bug out bags”, another zippered laundry bag for food such as Ramen noodles and other light food to carry when I have to leave my BOL.

     

    Robin

    #11969
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    Quality bandana or 2 – many uses:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YHfGr808CnM

    My traveling go-bag always have bandana and Shemagh. http://www.blackhawk.com/product/Shemaugh,33,12.htm

    #12502
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>RangerRick wrote:</div>
    I have nothing made of cotton in my bag. Gets wet and you freeze to death. I carry 2 spare sets of socks with liners, Buy oversize boots for wearing socks and liner at the same time. Keeps blisters at bay.I use the new military fleece and wool for my socks, long johns, pants and shirts. Outer wear is military also, light weight, durable and water proof. Depends on season what I carry and how heavy the clothing will be. In our SAR unit up here in North Idaho, I carry a new complete Antarctic winter suit with boots I scored at the local Veteran Standown. If you are a veteran goggle Stand Down and go score free gear.

    And what if I may ask lol is an Antarctic winter suit with boots? I can see that for a blizzard but I’m wondering if its functional trudging thru the snow on a 20F day. I usually find myself overheating just skiing or working. Goth forbid I would ever have to snowshoe in that stuff. I’ve got an old canadian winter parka I use if the wind is blowing and bunny boots. My long underwear usually winds up Duofold because the military polypro feels like its suffocating me. But thats life in the cold I suppose. Going from one extreme to the other and never quite comfortable in either one lol.

     

    #12578
    Profile photo of RangerRick
    RangerRick
    Survivalist
    member1

    The antarctic suit is a multi layer system that ends with the main parka coat, pants and bunny boots.

    I started using poly-underwear a size bigger than I need so I don’t get the the closed in feeling.

    I am on a Search and Rescue Team that goes no matter what. We do travel as far as we can by snowmobiles, tracked vehicle ect. When the trail can no longer be driven upon, we snowshoe. You start to heat up you unzip or remove layers of clothing. Pretty simple process really.

    Best Regards, Rick

    #13316
    Frozenthunderbolt
    Frozenthunderbolt
    Survivalist
    member4

    In my BOB I have a dry bag that has fleeces, polyprop undergarments, wool socks and some mil-surp camp trousers, shirts and a jacket. Gloves, ballistic sunglasses etc go without saying.
    I would add specilty garments depending on the season.
    My get home bag has socks, a woolie hat and gloves, anything else i should be wearing daily or have in my car.

    #25363
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Do some off you plan to wear a bulletproof vest?

    #25365
    Profile photo of RangerRick
    RangerRick
    Survivalist
    member1

    I volunteered with Red Cross for years working disasters on the east coast and gulf areas. I started in 63 while in high school and was able to deploy when I got older and retired in 03.
    Yes, I did wear body armor and also carried a weapon. It was very dangerous not to. Against all Red Cross rules, but it kept me alive and that is the only think I care about is myself and my team coming home alive. Not just bad guys, snakes, gators, wild animals ect.
    I no longer work with Red Cross since I moved to the PNW.
    Best Regards,
    RangerRick

    #25367
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Good question Leopard. I’ll admit I hadn’t thought about that being something I’d wear but if it were a true SHTF scenario with a breakdown in public order, then I can see it making sense.

    #25369
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>Leopard wrote:</div>Do some off you plan to wear a bulletproof vest?

    I won’t say never again, but its not planned.

    #25372
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Leopard,
    If you think you might be in a firefight it only makes sense to wear one.

    #25375
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>74 wrote:</div>Leopard,<br>
    If you think you might be in a firefight it only makes sense to wear one.

    It also makes sense to avoid that gunfight.
    Call in sick, take the day off, whatever.

    Post SHTF, while bugging out, those 4-8 pounds are better served with other supplies.

    I wore armor for 10 years straight. At the end of the day your chest smells like your feet, you feel 25 pounds lighter just by pulling a couple velcro straps off.

    It seems to take on a life of its own, taunting you, weighing you down. From the moment you put it on, it is a factor in everything you do.

    And because you’re “bulletproof”, you’re more likely to make stupid mistakes and take chances.

    And here’s a thought.
    From Clint Smith of Thunder Ranch in his Urban Rifle course,
    “Rifles eat armor the way Pac Man eats dots”.

    Standard armor, against a rifle? You’re still in trouble.

    #25377
    Profile photo of lovelynightbird
    lovelynightbird
    Prepper
    member2

    Military clothing is a good idea. Someone just gave us a few old items from their army days that I will now save instead of letting my husband use was work cloths. Thanks for the tip.

    LovelyNightBird

    #25381
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    If things start falling apart all together where I live, I will be wearing at least an undercover vest before I leave the house. It is not something that will fit into a BOB, no. You get different levels and you can remove the heavy plates if need be. I really hope that I will be in a position that I can take it with me.

    #25383
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Whirly,
    Why do all of our guys in combat where armor? I think where you are located and what you expect to run into it has a lot to do with whether you think you need it or not. Call in sick when it’s SHTF on you door step, oh really?

    Level III looks good to me. Who wants a sucking chest wound?
    NIJ LEVEL III:
    (High-powered rifle). This armor, normally of hard or semirigid construction, protects against 7.62mm full-metal jacketed bullets (US military designation M80) with nominal masses of 9.7 g (150 gr.) impacting at a velocity of 838 m/s (2,750 ft/s) or less. It also provides protection against threats such as 223 Remington (5.56mm FMJ), 30 Carbine FMJ, and 12-gauge rifled slug, as well as Level I through IIIA threats. Level III body armor is clearly intended only for tactical situations when the threat warrants such protection, such as barricade confrontations involving sporting rifles.
    https://www.officerstore.com/images/nijspec2.htm

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