Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 47 total)
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  • #33347
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Here are a few links for people to read about the safety of human manure and why lime works to reduce odor and kill pathogens.

    http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/composting/ingredients/composting-human-waste.htm

    http://www.lime.org/

    http://lime.org/lime-basics/uses-of-lime/enviromental/biosolids-and-sludge/

    #33351
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    Deleted.

    #33353
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    Deleted.

    #33362
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Part of the reality is what resources do you have locally. Moss would be pretty hard to come by around here in any quantity and short of having a deal with a sawmill, generating a lot of sawdust could be an issue too. The underlying bedrock around here though is marble and limestone. Crushed limestone is what we use for driveway material, which if you are ever in this part of VT is why you see so many white driveways.

    #33363
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    The problem with composting as I see it is that the process is not uniform so pockets of harmful pathogens could still be present. It’s not tested so you don’t know what you have one way or the other.

    “Although human waste is rich in plant-healthy nutrients, it also contains viruses, bacteria, and other pathogens that are not effectively removed by standard home composting processes.”

    #33364
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    Deleted.

    #33365
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    Deleted.

    #33367
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Thanks C,
    I plan on sticking with animal manure for gardens. As long as I can get water from the well we’ll be using the septic system.

    #33371
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I’m on septic too and have water in abundance via either my pond or my well (which has a handpump should the grid be down). I suppose I could easily collect rainwater via my downspouts too. All that said, it is good to know alternative means of dealing with waste because we could find ourselves far away from home when the SHTF.

    #33379
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>c wrote:</div>Whirlibird, bones do compost! …But you have to make bone broth first. I have a link for a recipe for making bone broth if you have never made bone broth. Bone broth is a way to use “waste” materials to make a very nourishing food.

    http://eatkamloops.org/beautiful-bone-broth/

    Normally, bones do not compost and will last decades… or longer in a compost pile… But we found that after making bone broth with the bones within a year the bones would dissolve in the garden. We think the vinegar added to making the bone broth to liberate the minerals weakens the bone structure making the bone dissolve.

    Sorry but I’ll stick with liming to get rid of human bone waste.
    The skulls and pelvis are particularly difficult,

    #33380
    Profile photo of lonewolf
    lonewolf
    Survivalist
    member6

    I thought the thread was about human SEWAGE why all the talk about bones, dealing with dead bodies is an entirely different thread not to be confused with composting poo!!

    British Survivalist.

    #33402
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    Deleted.

    #33449
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    C,
    I’m just adding to the conversation that the safety of using composted human waste on food producing gardens is not guaranteed.

    Realistically composting human waste is only feasible for rural residents. The logistics of obtaining sufficient quantities of material and storage become probematic. Buying bales of peat will probably not be possible after shtf. How many bales per person are required for a year? If I need one bale per month for each person then I need to store 12 bales times my group number. An equal amount of space is required for saving poo in piles for a year and a half.

    Unless you live near a sawmill sawdust is out of the question. Most sawmills are in rural locations although there are a few in overrun suburban locations.

    #33481
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    Deleted.

    #33483
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    If I saved the sawdust from the firewood I cut up every year we would have plenty to use in an outhouse or for composting. Right now I throw it out. My wife composts her garden with maple leaves of which we have tons every year and food scraps. Sometimes we buy a pickup bed worth of horse manure. We could do rabbits or chickens manure but the nimby town ordinances are against it. Buying it is ok we just can’t produce it. We used to have ducks as pets. Not anymore, too much poop! It also became a chore livetrapping all the critters they attracted. Humanure is a psychological issue with my wife. She might do it if the circumstances were survivalist but otherwise no no no. We’re not down to the bucket yet.

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