Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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  • #4182
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Few books I like, not necessary about survival.

    John Cristopher – Death of the grass

    One of the most realistically written book about how people are changing, and what people may become when SHTF. No heroes there, just folks trying to survive.

    Charles Bukowski – Post office

    Bukowski is one of my favorite writers, raw and real. Real life.

    George Orwell – 1984

    Scary look in how world might look, actually some of the things from the book will look probably familiar to you.

    Stephen King – Needful things

    Maybe not so popular like other King ‘s books, but for me really cool.

    Erich Maria Remarque – Flotsam

    It is actually book about survival, life and death. I suggest to read it as a part of prepping.

    Richard Matheson – I am legend

    Much better then movie!

    #4584
    nlouise
    nlouise
    Survivalist
    member4

    Death of Grass was very good.
    A few others like 1984 and I am Legend, I only saw the movies. I think they came out with a new movie version of 1984 that will be released soon.
    Supposedly Tom Clancy’s novel Command Authority is about what is happening in Crimea right now.
    Haven’t heard of Flotsam. I’ll have to look that one up.
    I read Needful things. I like Stephen King anyways, and The Stand was very good and one of my favorites.

    #4921
    anika
    anika
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    I would like to add “The Gift of Fear,” by Gavin de Becker, if this is the right place for that. Reading Malgus’ post at http://community.shtfschool.com/forums/topic/bad-guys-are-ruthless-even-in-dirtville-usa/ reminded me of this useful tome, and I would recommend it as a good read to anyone looking to heighten their situational awareness, and develop better intuition as to what’s a real threat and what is just the constant worry spawned by the instant media age.

    It has helped me a lot, not only to stop discounting my internal awareness of things that aren’t quite right around me, but also to separate Chicken-Little panic about situations, from real fear — and how to act on it. This book is the champion of the little voice in the back of your head, and how it can save your life.

    #5984
    Profile photo of libbylindy
    libbylindy
    Survivalist
    member4

    There are several books by Ayn Rand that are really good and have an insight into what it would be like to live under communism. That was her background, so it invades her books. They are good reading.

    #17623
    Profile photo of Anselm
    Anselm
    Survivalist
    member6

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>Selco wrote:</div>Few books I like, not necessary about survival.

    John Cristopher – Death of the grass

    One of the most realistically written book about how people are changing, and what people may become when SHTF. No heroes there, just folks trying to survive.

    Charles Bukowski – Post office

    Bukowski is one of my favorite writers, raw and real. Real life.

    George Orwell – 1984

    Scary look in how world might look, actually some of the things from the book will look probably familiar to you.

    Stephen King – Needful things

    Maybe not so popular like other King ‘s books, but for me really cool.

    Erich Maria Remarque – Flotsam

    It is actually book about survival, life and death. I suggest to read it as a part of prepping.

    Richard Matheson – I am legend

    Much better then movie!

    Orwell has two other books that you might enjoy: the novel “Keep the Aspidistra Flying” and the autobiography “Down and Out in Paris and London”. Right after World War I, millions of English people lived in a small rented room each, always decorated with an aspidistra plant, so the plant was sort of “the flag of the poor”; and they subsisted exclusively on bread with margarine, and tea. The Down and Out work shows Orwell’s life as a tramp on the roads of England, from one Salvation Army hospice to another, and working in the basement kitchen of a Paris restaurant and in that of a Russian restaurant also in Paris. It is a great exercise in survival to put oneself mentally in such situations and think “How would I handle it?”.

    #18982
    Profile photo of Glockerman
    Glockerman
    Survivalist
    member2

    “Unintended Consequences” by John Ross. Great read! Fictional story about an overencroaching and abusive government on gun ownership. People decide to fight back and come up with some interesting ways to take out bureaucrats. A PDF file of the book can be found for free download.

    I’ve read a bunch of paperback books about sniper feats, such as those of Hathcock. Helpful tips can be gleaned from them about stalking.

    #18992
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Hatchet, Bryan’s Winter, and The River by Gary Paulsen. Not really adult books but a great set of books to get kids interested in survival. They were some of my favorites when I was young.

    #18993
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Death in the Long Grass by Peter Capstick. It is a recount of some of his adventures and close calls as a professional hunter in Africa. A great book to take you somewhere far away on a rainy day.

    #19493
    Profile photo of Anselm
    Anselm
    Survivalist
    member6

    There’s also “My Side of the Mountain” by Jean Craighead George and its sequel “On the Far Side of the Mountain”.
    Although these books, like those of Gary Paulsen — “Hatchet” and its sequels — are gems, there is an important failing in them which misleads generation after generation of juvenile survivalists: the lack of mention of rodents. Neither of the boys depicted could have stored food as depicted because, in real life, mice and rats would have devastated the provisions. Also, Paulsen makes a big thing of mosquitos, but he doesn’t focus on gnats, horse flies, black flies, the other flies … Other than that, the books of both authors are precious.

    #19496
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    This a great book about real life adventure and hardship, the first man to sail single-handed around the world in 1895.
    Sailing Alone Around the World – Joshua Slocum printed in 1900

    http://www.ibiblio.org/eldritch/js/saaw.htm

    #46083
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    Had a few extra minutes this evening to do some further exploring of the Forum – far too much to appreciate here, sadly! But I found this topic, and thought I’d add a couple of short ones – including one REALLY short one. Both are by the same author: Joseph M. Marshall III. Both are also in a traditional Lakota (Sioux Indian) story telling format – something of which the author is a master, in my opinion.

    Keep Going: The Art of Perseverance is only 133 pages, and those are VERY short pages. It is a teenage boy seeking wisdom from an elder he calls Grandfather, though that may be only in the traditional sense of respect for tribal elders. I tend to think it was a blood-line grandfather, but it really doesn’t matter in the end. It may seem to start out slowly, and not seem to make much sense – stay with it. I found it to be very quietly yet powerfully motivational for those times when it almost doesn’t seem “worth it” to keep trying, and it would be easier to just give up and let whatever happens happen.

    Prior to reading the above book, I had gotten Returning to the Lakota Way: Old Values to Save a Modern World well over a year ago. I started slow, not fully appreciating what I was reading in the first few “chapters.” Each is a stand-alone story in itself, and weaves in Native American philosophies of life and values with traditional story telling, which can include conversations between people and animals, mythical groups even back to the beginning of the history of mankind (their literal “emergence” from the earth onto the surface – you’ll have to read that all the way through to truly appreciate it), etc. The second half of each chapter, however, relates the traditional story to modern life in a way that can apply to anyone. By the time I finished the last chapter/story, it had become an emotional experience. What took a while to get through initially (the first few chapters), suddenly went quite quickly, as I found it harder and harder to put the book down even though each chapter ended a story completely, and there was no direct relationship between one and the next.

    What I particularly appreciate about Marshall’s writing is the powerful wisdom that is also easy to at least partially miss because of its simplicity. And the type of story telling could, on the surface, be mistaken for something more suitable for children. That would be a huge mistake, though with children that aren’t too young, it could also be an interesting mutual activity between parent and child, or discussion after each reads a chapter (story) themselves.

    While each tribe has its own traditions, there are things that cut across such differences that become quite universal. There is much to be learned in these two books (and likely, most anything Marshall writes). I plan to read more of his writing – it’s peaceful, thought provoking, and wise, just not your usual Barnes & Noble best-seller table material (sadly).

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #47955
    Profile photo of Corvus
    Corvus
    Survivalist
    member4

    Hello, if you dare care to read how the people who lived vastly freer lives than Americans live today had to say about the Europeans that were some of your relatives who managed obtain land, then read: BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE by Dee Brown.

    #47964
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    That’s a tough thing to read, but deeply important. As I posted elsewhere in the Forum a while ago, one of the finest talks on freedom and the Constitution I’ve ever seen by anyone, was the video by Russell Means, titled “Americans are the new Indian.” I recommend it highly.

    Shorter, and much more to Corvus’ point, is the following video. Unfortunately, I cannot find Part II of the video. But even just Part I gives an excellent overview of what led up to the 1973 Wounded Knee seige:

    For some history of the massacre at Wounded Knee in 1890, this Russell Means video is a good start:

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 6 months ago by Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint GeorgiaSaint.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 6 months ago by Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint GeorgiaSaint.
    #48688
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    I like Rawles books. Expats, Patriots. They’re really upbeat and have a good feel. Plus they come in MP3 generally.

    Another book I’ve been reading is The Balk by Billy Roper. It’s like a continuation of Thomam Chittim CW2, a real Turner Diaries viewpoint.

    Another one is Get What’s Yours – maxing out your social security. By kotlikoff
    A BJs special I picked up while shopping recently.
    Already learning new things.

    One other BJs book. Operation Snow by John Koster Soviet mole in the FDR White House.

    Also watching the second season of the Americans. The 1980s soviet spy drama. Pretty good. Lower level spying. More interesting. They’re in afghan at the same time so you can see it from the opposite pov comparing to Charlie Wilsons war.

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