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  • #9087
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Has anyone used a knife with the “Tracker” blade shape? I bought this knife for my brother and was wondering what your thoughts were on it. The blade thickness is just shy of 1/4 ” and the blade length is about 4″.

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    #9092
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Got to play with one for a short period of time, it is interesting, but not one I am really happy using.

    As a weapon, its a lot better than as a general knife or tool.
    For my use of course.

    Something about the balance, the weight, the difficulty sharpening in the field.

    Agsin, personal feel not scientific study.

    #9124
    Profile photo of Georgethreshman
    Georgethreshman
    Survivalist
    member2

    I prefer a stainless steel knife, 5 1/2 ” blade, serrated, with saw tooth top, non metal grip wrapped with leather cord or paracord. The guard should have two holes , one on either side. Leather sheath with whetstone on one side , magnesium firestarter with steel striker on other. Steel pommel nut in case steel firestarter lost. Stainless will not start fire.

    Best combo stainless knife & stainless hatchet…no rust. No metal grip to stick to hand in below 0 weather.

    #9170
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Matt,
    It falls into the category of collectible because of the fancy handle and blade shape. The Damascus blade can be very strong, however when buying one unless you know the maker you never have a clear idea what they did to make it. If you have a Lansky sharpener the tight inside curve is no problem to sharpen. The broad round tip is typical of a skinner a lot of times they are rounder and less pointy.

    #9279
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    I agree 1974. My brother actually asked me to pick 3 of these up for him. He is giving them as gifts. 1 will be used by a friend of his while hunting, The others will most likely wind up on display.I am not a big fan of wide and short blades. I was just curious if anyone had experience with this design.

    #9362
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Knives of Alaska set photo output_zpslsreflgz.jpg

    For a while I used this Knives of Alaska set.
    The ‘cleaver’ is around 3/8″ thick, it will cleave an elk pelvis without damage. I had to have it reground as the angle of the edge was much too blunt and it wouldn’t actually cut.

    This and a Cold Steel SRK soured me on thick blades for all around use. If I wanted to bludgeon my way through what I want to cut, I wouldn’t have chosen a knife.

    #9379
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Under 10 Degree Angles
    The lowest angles are reserved for edges that are typically cutting softer materials. In this case, the edges are not subject to abuse so the lower angle can be maintained without damage or edge failure. The lowest angles that we typically see are on straight edge razors. These are sharpened to an angle which is roughly 7 to 8 degrees (although the back of the blade is used as a guide so knowing the angle isn’t important and nor is it adjustable). A straight razor has a very delicate edge that is very easy to damage. In proper usage, a straight razor would never see the type of use that would damage the edge.

    10 to 17 Degrees Angles
    A sharpening angle of 10 to 17 degrees is still quite low for most knives. With a total angle of 20 to 34 degrees, this is still a very fine edge. This edge is typically too weak for any knife that might be used in any type of chopping motion. Also consider that harder steels are also more susceptible to impact damage because they are more brittle. If your knife is used for cutting soft items or slicing meats, this lower angle can hold up and provide a very smooth cutting action.

    17 to 22 Degree Angles
    A 17 to 20 degree angle covers most kitchen knives. Some knives (typically Japanese manufacturers) will sharpen their knives to roughly 17 degrees. Most western knives are roughly 20 degrees. It is our experience that kitchen knives sharpened to 15 to 20 degrees cut very well and are still durable. These angles are still not highly durable as a total angle under 40 degrees will not respond well to rougher treatment in harder materials.

    22 to 30 Degree Angles
    In this range, the knife edges are considerably more durable. A pocket knife or a hunting knife will inevitably see abuse not seen by knives meant primarily for slicing or chopping softer materials. While the edge may not ultimately be cut as well (but you may not notice a difference) it will be considerably more durable.

    Over 30 Degrees Angles
    Any edged tool or knife that is sharpened past 30 degrees will be very durable. Its cutting ability will be noticeably reduced. This durability has an advantage because more force can be used to make the cut. While the majority of knives won’t benefit from this sharpening angle, an edged tool like a machete, cleaver or axe must be durable as the typical cutting action of these tools would damage other edges.

    It’s interesting how such simple tools can have the effectiveness altered by a change of only a few degrees of angle in the shape of the edge.

    From he sharpeming supplies web site:

    #11827
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    I came across the Tom Brown Tracker Fixed Blade Knife today and it looks pretty interesting and much more suitable for outdoor use.

    I like Micarta handles in general and the sheath looks good too.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #11875
    Profile photo of Georgethreshman
    Georgethreshman
    Survivalist
    member2

    Your tracker looks useful.  Thick blade less apt to break when prying,  more useful for skinning game.

    #11877
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Jay,

    I would not like this knife because of the edge grind. The sharp bump or ridge created at the transition to the tip curve limits long slicing. That spot will dull rapidly and not sharpen well.

    The btb sheath would be a disaster when returning back into the sheath. If the sheath opening can’t be seen then a person would have to use their fingers to guide the blade. This is the one hand doesn’t know what the other is doing moment.  Something is going to get cut or stabbed.  Personally I feel that is a high price for a knife.

    Edit: I would find this shape better for myself. (I’m not promoting this particular knife)

    http://www.agrussell.com/fox-israeli-tracker-kapap/p/FO-FX602/

     

    #11888
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Depends on what you are wanting to get out of the knife , like Tanto shape blades , depends on what you want it for , so its a pro and a con at the same time . I have a Cold Steel GI Tanto , its almost indestructible , Its a very sharp crow bar , I use it for heavy tasks like battoning , chopping , prying ,etc. and it works very well for that , on the other hand , its worthless at tasks requiring more finesse .

    #11897
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    I would not like this knife because of the edge grind. The sharp bump or ridge created at the transition to the tip curve limits long slicing. That spot will dull rapidly and not sharpen well.

    Thanks 1974, makes sense. I didn’t consider the maintenance.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

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