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  • #50564
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    Worrying about my heat signature is altogether different from knowing “what is out there and how to counter it,” as namelus said. I personally chose to invest in a FLIR device so, particularly in widespread power-out circumstances, I can see what is, in fact, “out there.” I chose the FLIR so there’s no active IR “red dot” for bad guys to aim at. Most of them will not have any night vision capability, and if they do, they’ll probably be far better equipped in other ways as well, and I can only do as much as I can do. But I don’t regret having the FLIR so *I* can see what’s going bump in the night, without being seen as a glowing red dot that emanates from most IR night vision devices (at least the ones I can afford). Seems only prudent to me.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 3 weeks ago by Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint GeorgiaSaint.
    • This reply was modified 9 months, 2 weeks ago by Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint GeorgiaSaint.
    #50568
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Good recommendation , The scout monocular looks good to me . Now that a pro 2nd Amendment president is in , I can save up , and use the money for that , rather than another firearm .

    #50571
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    A FLIR would be a nice short range device but when you have a house with surveillance cams you need illumination. I just ordered a pair of cmvision 198 led 130m IR floods. If the power goes out these are tied into an inverter that instantly switches to battery power. They won’t help my no glow trail cams but people aren’t supposed to see them. There are all kinds of surveillance systems around this place. One person accused me of spying on my neighbors. I said no no no I’m only doing what he’s doing to me. I would love a power outage here. It gives me a chance to go out and see who has what.

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 2 weeks ago by Profile photo of Brulen Brulen.
    #50574
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    The scout monocular looks good to me

    The Scout is exactly what I got. There are two versions, I just found the marine version about $10 cheaper from a vendor on Amazon (after verifying with the FLIR folks that they honor warranties on Amazon purchases – they do). There is ZERO technological or operational difference between the land version and the marine version, other than the outer color of the device.

    I really like it. I’ve found that I’d probably only use the white on black, rather than the different color schemes, but that’s a personal preference. I found that picking out the warm objects (critters only, so far) is much easier with them showing up as the brightest white, with a darker or black background. Just be aware that FLIRs need unimpeded line of sight, meaning NO glass in between. You cannot use it through a window, or to see if someone’s inside a car (also through a window). It’s got to have direct access to the heat signature. But if your questionable object/person/critter is behind some bushes, particularly at night after any of the sun-generated heat is gone from the bushes, the heat from a person is quite noticeable through the little cracks between the leaves and branches. My wife was able to easily pick me up while squatting behind some scrawny bushes about 50 feet out. There is zero doubt it would have worked at and beyond 100 feet.

    During the day, it was really intriguing just how clearly squirrels showed up on a warm day, hanging on the side of a large oak about 50 feet out. The tree was light grey, but the squirrels were brilliant white. Some leaves higher up were also quite bright white due to direct sunlight having heated them from overhead, but it’s amazing how well the unit calibrates to the average heat signatures in whatever view you’ve got – totally unlike a “regular” night vision device that simply cannot be used in daylight. And at night, with no heating from the sun, warm blooded creatures are exceptionally visible. I just don’t happen to like the various color schemes – b/w or w/b seems to provide the best definition of what I bought it for.

    We now return to our regularly scheduled programming – clothing. ;-) (Sorry ’bout that, folks.)

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 2 weeks ago by Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint GeorgiaSaint.
    #50576
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Wigwam wool with liner built in a 15 buck socks get it at an army Surplus store. Also at a construction trades shop for work clothes found great socks at 7 bucks a pair loaded up on them — mostly a poly bend but cushy. Who wear MUCK boots? They are great for ice snow mud and slush and rain — that’s their name MUCK boots all sorts of designs well worth the money — There’s NO laces on them.

    I don’t have the Muck brand but I bought a high end pair of winter boots last year. I also have quite a few good wool socks. If you can keep your feet, hands, and head warm the rest of the body will take care of itself. I have a pair of high end winter gloves and a nice bomber/trapper hat that works well in the coldest weather.

    The other thing of paramount importance is staying dry. I bought a pair of hip waders after misjudging how deep the water was that resulted in the knee high boots I was wearing filling with 32 degree water. I had chopped away ice in a small stream to unplug a pipe and then had to reach down with my hand to pull away some debris. This was only a few hundred feet from the house and in the couple minutes it took to get there I could hardly walk or use my hands due to the effect of the cold water. The air temp was in the low teens I think. Once you are wet in cold temps your situation deteriorates rapidly.

    #50577
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Yak wool , its 50% warmer than sheep wool . I got my wife a pair of knee high Yak wool socks . She had to take them off because her feet got hot . Here is another one on my ” to get ” list . Expensive , yes , but here in Maine in the middle of winter , a good base layer will help relieve you of the bulk , giving better freedom of movement .

    http://www.kora.net/usa/yak-wool-fabric

    #50578
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Tolik, did you buy the yak wool socks online or at a store?

    The 1st deep freeze to down near zero is coming next week, so winter is on its way. These balmy days in the 30’s won’t last forever.

    #50581
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    mohair sock are still the warmest and best by far but pricing is up there at $40 plus per pair. I Have had a set for 3 years nearly weekly wear still in good shape , work boots and rubber boots at a farm. When hiking you can stream wash without soap and hang dry off pack the natural anti bacterial of the fiber has a no smell thing, and warm yet still not bad in summer when you need thick socks

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 2 weeks ago by Profile photo of namelus namelus.
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    #50588
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    MountainBiker ,
    I picked them up on-line .

    #50606
    Profile photo of Corvus
    Corvus
    Survivalist
    member4

    You describe the life of a veteran winter survivor traveling on the tires and the foot wear…I guess you are in the snow belt of the USA or Canada (it’s all snow there). I only used snow tires on my back wheel drive my front wheel drive cars–none for my AWD. Do you snow shoe?

    #50607
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Nope , I dont buy snow tires either , I just put 200 lbs of play sand over the rear wheels of my truck , it does fine . Also , after a winter or two , you figure out real fast what roads not to use in the winter , usually because of the grade . Thats why in Maine , there is usually more than two ways to get to the same place .

    #50608
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I don’t use snow tires either but our vehicles are 4WD, and I’ve 40 some odd years of practice. A big part of it however is road crews, even in the smallest towns, generally know what they’re doing and keep the roads in decent condition. It is only during the storm itself if the plows can’t keep up or if its a wet snow that becomes hardpack that it is iffy. I have to go up and over a mountain on a very curvy road in order to get pretty much anywhere and earlier this week it did have hardpack conditions one morning before the road crew was able to get enough salt down. It was a bit hairy going down, and I had a school bus in front of me trying to maneuver it too.

    I live on a dirt road. For dirt roads the desired winter condition is the opposite. They don’t salt them as you don’t want the surface melting and creating slippery mud atop a frozen underbase. You want it hardpack all winter, but the road crew makes sure there is always some sand or grit on it to give traction. About a half a mile up the road from me is as steep a hill as you are going to find anywhere and the road crew checks it every day. The situation is made worse by it barely being two cars wide in the summer, so they really need to pay attention to it in the winter. Fortunately I rarely need to go in that direction as it wouldn’t get me anywhere I need to go.

    I usually wear winter boots throughout the winter months and always have heavy duty gloves and my bomber hat in the truck too should I get stuck somewhere and need to stay warm.

    #50634
    Profile photo of Corvus
    Corvus
    Survivalist
    member4

    Who is wearing a “face (nose) mask” or a wrapped up scarf or one those middle eastern cotton “shemeg” covers in the cold? Also, who has a solid recommendation for gloves that won’t cost more than say 80 bucks? I bought gloves from Duluth Trading that needed some extra liners–they have the higher wrist cover and pull cords those are better than their shorter model.

    #50635
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    A shemagh?
    Pass. Cotton kills.

    Now a decent fleece scarf, yes.
    A balaclava, got one of them also.
    And an excellent wind stopper camo head cover, think an oversized hood that tucks into your coat.

    Gloves?
    Best I have are some .MIL mitts with the trigger finger addition. Wool lined leather and some synthetic. They come halfway up my fore arm. Other than that, I make do with ski gloves unless working.

    #50943
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Ice rain tonight. My wife went to the store earlier and when she came out had to very carefully walk to our 4×4. Not being able to get in the drivers side she got in the passenger side and crawled over the gear shift. The roads were all heavy slush on the way home and at one point she almost was blown off the interstate. Very glad I put new hakkapelittas snow tires on all 4 wheels this year. I keep telling her about the carbide studs on my Icebug boots but I guess it’ll be a 100 ft elbows and knees thru a parking lot before she’s convinced. I been thinking about carrying a pair of snowshoes in the kit but it’s not that bad yet. So far just a down jacket and survival pack, water TP and a little food/ candy bars. Gloves? Nope, mittens with hand warmer pockets, a froggy toggs bib and a Russian army style hat for very cold below zero. Just a scarf usually. Although I have a rebreather for extreme cold. It’s that or serious lung congestion which is bad stuff. Extreme cold puts extra stress on the lungs and heart.

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