Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 45 total)
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  • #48463
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    i bought some winter mohair socks i absolutely love them two pairs one on my feet one in the wash i have washed in a stream and dried while hikeing with no soap and have gone weeks like that no foot rot.

    anyone else have items they find super useful?

    #48467
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    Namelus, where did you get them? I can’t wear the usual chain store/brand name socks due to some weird circulation problems that act like diabetic neuropathy, but I don’t have diabetes. My wife has knitted me two (with a 3rd currently in production) pair of high quality wool socks that don’t bind (i.e. no elastic – just the wool), and I LOVE them. Are yours elasticized? If not I’d definitely be interested in your mohair socks if they’re available on line. I learned, much to my surprise, that high quality knitted wool socks wick moisture away from the skin very nicely, and aren’t particularly hot in the summer. With temps starting to get into the 80s now, I’ve had a chance to very skeptically test that story out, and was pleasantly surprised.

    (I’m getting very spoiled – custom made, fitted socks that stay up without any elastic! Eventually, I hope to have nothing but the knitted wool socks – they just take a while for my wife to make, unfortunately.)

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 7 months ago by Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint GeorgiaSaint.
    #48470
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I wear somewhat expensive wool socks in the winter but then in the summer when working outside I wear those cheap white tube socks you buy in a package.

    For me my most useful clothes are a couple jackets. One is an LL Bean Goretex shell type jacket with hood. It sheds rain so as to keep me dry and because the wind doesn’t penetrate it, it will keep me warm down into the 30’s despite only being a thin shell. If I am walking at a decent pace or riding a bike it’ll keep me warm down into the 20’s. Of course I am mostly impervious to cold so your mileage may vary. For cold weather what I find incredibly useful is a Carhartt winter weight jacket with detachable hood (that I always just leave attached). Those Carhartts never wear out and mine has always kept me warm no matter how low the temperature has gone.

    #48471
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Wrangler Riggs ranger work pants , they are on the pricy side , but tough as nails , the ones I have are not denim …….thank god . Double reinforced in heavy wear areas , cargo pant style with several interesting side pickets ( probably for screws , nails , etc . ) hammer loop , leather trim side and rear pockets . Your going to have these for a long time . The nice thing is about them , is that they look nice , similar to dockers , you could wear them out and about , and not look like a carpenter . Worth the money . Thin enough that your comfortable , thick enough that they are not going to hell very soon at all .

    #48472
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Tolik, good recommendation, I researched the pants after your post. They are made with Cordova, highly abrasion resistant.

    Asolo’s Power Matic 100 GV hiking boots. Extremely well designed and constructed. One of the features I like are the metal roller eye loops on the lower section of the boot, with a locking jam loop above them. Makes pulling the laces tight really easy with no wear on the laces. The rollers prevent normal lace wear at the critical friction point. The soles have very good support for your feet under loads and sharp pointed rocks don’t push through and create a pressure point. On top of everything the boots are light weight and waterproof.

    #48473
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I wasn’t familiar with the Wrangler Riggs and looked them up. I like them.

    74, good boots such as you describe are worth the money. Not that brand but I have a couple good pair myself.

    #48474
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB,
    The right footwear is imperative for me. I have a few problems with my feet and the wrong shoe makes me go lame in no time. If your feet hurt you’re pretty much immobile, so I really try to have sturdy footwear designed for a heavy load.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 7 months ago by Profile photo of 74 74.
    #48477
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    I absolutely concur with the Wrangler Riggs recommendation. I own three pair (got one for my wife to cut off at the knee, just below the cargo pockets for shorts in the summer). The oldest pair is almost everyday for me, and wearing exceptionally well! Pants for me tend to show the first real wear on the back left pocket where my wallet goes. There’s still virtually no sign of wear there at all after at least two years (maybe going on three – can’t remember). I also like the cargo pockets. The left side is used for my cell phone, and the right side is WONDERFUL for small carry – with a good pocket holster there’s no “print” that is identifiable no matter what position you’re sitting or standing in – and very easy access.

    One other comment on the back pockets: the way they’re constructed, there’s very little chance of a wallet ever falling out, and it would also be less easy for a pick-pocket to get it out undetected, compared to any other pants I’ve owned. I LOVE the Wrangler Riggs – very rugged, yet quite acceptable for wearing around town. Yes, they’re a bit warmer in the summer, but no more than a moderate-weight pair of jeans at most.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #48478
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    One thing that could be helpful with footwear is to remove the inner part of a pair of GOOD running shoes that you might be considering replacing anyway. I inserted a pair in my work boots that came out of any old pair of Nike running shoes, and it helped immensely. The support is generally better than most anything you’ll find in the drug store shoe insert aisle, by far (and I’ve tried most of them). A decent article on the subject is here. I’ve been surprised at how well running shoe inserts hold up even when the main shoe is worn out, so I just recycle them into work shoes or boots (plus, they’re already fully conformed to my foot).

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #48479
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    That does bring up a good point . Do as GS suggested or find decent insoles , they will make a big difference !

    #48481
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    A while ago I bought a belly band to carry a small tomcat. But after a while I found the belly band worked better on my back and hips as a support. So now I use heating pads under it if I’m sore or stiff. Stiffness is usually a condition that makes it difficult to twist the hips, to get out of bed or a chair. The 12 hour heat pads and a belly band are the way to go. Overdoing it on certain types of work is a bummer when you get older. Peel and stick body warmers by Grabber. I usually buy a couple of boxes every year. I’ve heard there’s a new model of the belly band but I haven’t tried it yet.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 7 months ago by Profile photo of Brulen Brulen.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 7 months ago by Profile photo of Brulen Brulen.
    #48484
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I had to go with orthopedic insoles I buy from the foot Dr. They’re semi hard molded plastic with some cushion.

    #48487
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    Brulen, much to my surprise, good quality cherry juice really has lived up to many peoples’ claims about back and other joint pain, particularly lower back. Some claim that tart cherry juice is better than black cherry juice, but I strongly prefer black cherry juice and since drinking some daily, have notice far less general joint stiffness, and particularly my back. If interested, you might want to stay away from non-organic, since cherries reportedly get very high amounts of pesticides during growing. You can get “Tart is Smart” brand of organic black cherry juice concentrate through Sam’s Club (if you’ve got a membership, or know someone that can get it for you). I’ve tried virtually all of them, and that brand is by far the best, and Sam’s has a far better price than anywhere (the lowest price on Amazon is actually shipped from Sam’s, but with a nearly 100% mark-up). Supposedly a few Sam’s Stores have it, but not around here – I can only get it at Sams.com. Beware of grocery store brands, even the supposedly better ones including the organic varieties – they’re usually a blend of many juices, with the cherry juice being what’s most prominent in the product name (check ingredients!).

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #48489
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Organic can be a scam , beware of produce , or products that are ‘ certified organic ‘ , and just happen to be a product of Mexico , or any other country for that matter . You have no way of knowing that it actually is organic if out of the country . If in doubt , buy a kosher version of the same thing , it will at least be to a higher standard , than the regular stuff .

    #48490
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    I have found iron lace https://www.ironlace.com/ 3 years in work boots on a farm still same laces stronger then para cord.

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