Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
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  • #36546
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    The other day this article was on Survival Blog, and I thought it worth sharing. As the article suggests, the fact that you don’t have babies at home doesn’t mean you won’t come SHTF. I took the list and have bought just about everything on it, plus a few items he didn’t have. I still need to get a couple small items and we already had certain big stuff (high chair, play pen, crib etc) that our daughter can’t haul with her when she visits. The routine had been before she came I’d run to the store and get anything she wanted but come SHTF the stores won’t be open. Her youngest is 9 months and it is likely they couldn’t make it here anyway in a sudden SHTF but maybe there will be more babies and maybe they would be here. Our son hasn’t started a family yet and they will be here come SHTF. Note that when the birth control runs out post-SHTF, there will be an uptick in babies being born.

    In a couple follow-up letters to the article people suggested buying a baby food grinder to make your own and that seems to be a pretty smart idea.

    http://survivalblog.com/caring-for-babies-in-a-post-collapse-world-by-f-c/

    #36556
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Ironic timing on this, one of my friends had his daughter last Sunday.

    Will have to forward the list.

    #36604
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Baby preps and pet preps , pets are easy , babies will take a lot of supplies .

    #36611
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Biodegradable diapers are available and can be composted. A commercial paper shredder … I would guess. It would be a mechanical process. The cloth diaper would seem better. Simply wash and run the waste into a tank as liquid manure.

    #36637
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    And many things on this list you can use for yourself and children anyway.

    #36851
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>Whirlibird wrote:</div>Ironic timing on this, one of my friends had his daughter last Sunday.

    Will have to forward the list.

    Get her a malamute puppy. Forward that. Its a gift that keeps on giving. lick lick slurp. Babies and dogs the perfect companions.

    #36852
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    They have a malinois, she has already adopted the kid.

    I’d prefer a Labrador but I’m biased after having two of the greatest Labs.

    #36857
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Kids need Amoxicillen, lots and lots of it. Enough doses for sickness 4-5 times a year for 15 years. The bubblegum flavored stuff is the easiest to give by the spoon full. Pulling apart capsules and mixing it into a syrup will work.

    Very estute thinking MtBikerer. How about this though. Before you have to care for the baby you have to deliver it. I think I’m going to need more then hot water for that. There will be work for Midwives again.

    #36868
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Yes, midwifery will be a very valuable skill. I may have mentioned it before but there is a cemetery here in my little hamlet that dates back to the latter 1700’s when the neighborhood was settled. I took a walk through one day reading headstones from the latter 1700’s and 1st half of the 1800’s. I saw too many young women in their late teens and 20’s and too many babies and toddlers. I already knew from my own genealogical research that women frequently died as a result of childbirth complications and virtually every family lost babies and toddlers up until about 100 years ago, but seeing the tombstones made it all the more real knowing this was life in this very neighborhood.

    At this point I bought everything on the list, and more, except for clothing which I wasn’t planning to do. Of course at any given point in time my wife has clothes here that she’s bought for the girls that she’s just waiting for an opportunity or occasion to give them.

    #36872
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Don’t start stockpiling antibiotics such as amox before finding out if anyone, especially little ones are allergic.

    As one who is allergic to the ‘cillins’, it can be a major concern.

    #36886
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    But whirly, you have to buy them now. If kids are born after shtf where will you buy antibiotics?

    #36896
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Buy some certainly, but don’t stockpile cases of something that may kill one of you.

    The other problem, most of these items have a fairly definite shelf life, after time some can become either very weak or potentially dangerous.
    If memory serves, tetracycline after a couple of years can become dangerous. Will have to look that up.

    Perhaps we can get our host to jump in on this one.

    And I hate to say it, but sometimes the bush hippies are right and there are some good natural cures available. Time to do the research while we can.

    #36898
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Whirly,
    Sorry to disagree but just because one person MIGHT be allergic sometime in the future is no reason to not have an adequate supply for everyone that can tolerate them. Antibiotics save lives and there aren’t many substitutes. Pre antibiotics people died from pneumonia and other infections frequently. A big supply, more then you can use would be the best plan. Other people will need them.

    Shelf life:
    “Antibiotics such as amoxicillin are generally safe for consumption for many years, provided they are stored carefully and according to the standard instructions for storage of drugs. However, most pharmaceutical companies set a 2 year shelf life for most drugs, including antibiotics.

    #36903
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    74 I get what you are saying but in my last “group”, we had two who were deathly allergic to two different antibiotics.
    Myself and the ‘cillins’, and the other to sulfa drugs.

    I keep/kept sulfa drugs on hand, cause they work the best for me. However on a hunting trip where he was injured and the sulfa drug offered, I received a look like I was trying to poison him. A few months later and the opposite happened.

    As to shelf life, while many are viable past two years, this is one area where I am ultra conservative, especially when children are concerned. Post-shtf lack of antibiotics may be a killer, but the lack of treatment for an allergic reaction to that antibiotic surely will be.

    #36905
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Whirly,
    I think this topic really just highlights the need for practical training in first aid and medical treatments. My son is highly allergic to all milk products so I have been practicing ingredient identification for a long time. At first we had EpiPens for him just in case. Found we didn’t need them eventually.

    One of the First questions they ask at the ER; what medicines are you Allergic to?

    btw, I’m not bashing homiopathic remedies, I just don’t know of one for infection in the lungs that works.

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