Viewing 12 posts - 16 through 27 (of 27 total)
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  • #39114
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Well I guess everything walken in the woods will know where you are, linseed oil has such a strong smell.

    #39117
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    RV antifreeze for the water system also works well. and is safe.
    Standard antifreeze (ethylene glycol) also works well but the dog will be licking the axe head if you let him.

    #39119
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    The trick is to dry the handle at the head before you put it on so it won’t loosen. Heating the axe head (not so hot it turns color) so it expands and put it together hot. Then when everything cools down it will be stuck on like it grew there. Same thing with barrel hoops and wagon wheel rims.

    #39869
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I’ve thought I should bring children into the discussion. Like any other dangerous tool serious consideration should be applied whether or not it’s safe for any individual to use or, to leave the axe unattended. This thread got me to thinking about when I first used an axe, 10 years old at best and how crazy it was for my father to let me split wood at that age. I asked him about it last night and he said “I never had to worry about you doing physical things”, and I’m thinking like chopping my foot off?

    A little while later the kids across the street borrowed a fire axe from their dad. The group of us went about a mile away and chopped down about 20 trees in the local protected watershed to build a log cabin. We built a square with about 10 of the logs before things went bad. Fortune was on my side for this one, as I was away on family vacation when they (the boys across the street) were caught red handed in the woods.

    If you have youngsters give it some thought.

    #39875
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    74 Boys & girls are too busy on their little addict boxes to ever think of doing anything like that these days.
    I’ve switched to ballistol for my tool handles. One oil for everything.

    #41670
    Profile photo of Ugaldie
    Ugaldie
    Survivalist
    member1

    Make sure the axe head is well attached and will not fly off while you are chopping.
    Keeping the axe in a very low humidity environment in the winter will often lead to wood shrinkage.

    There is a perfect axe if you don’t want to have those problems,

    3Kg Jauregi splitting axe

    #41682
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Ugaldie,
    That looka like a laminated head with weld in the center. Could you explain your picture?

    #41683
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    The haft was well fitted to the eye, soaked, then driven on so that the wood swelled above the eye…. That is what it looks like to me.

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    #41685
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I was on my phone so I couldn’t tell what I was looking at. I think it growed there.

    #41687
    Profile photo of Ugaldie
    Ugaldie
    Survivalist
    member1

    It’s a Basque axe,
    Jauregi 3Kg splitting axe
    The head is casted and the bit zone forged. This way you have the head completelly made of steel and the zone which works is strengthened as the old school axes. Indeed this is one of the oldest axe school’s actual example. Ask me if you want more information about this concern.
    The interest of those axes from a prepper point of view is its manteinance ease. Forgot it if you are looking for a breaching tool, those axes are hard and tough, but the lack of poll make competitors better in this concern. Those axes are the best if you are looking for long therm working tool.
    As I have said the head is very good, but what makes those axes different, and better, is the eye. They have an oval conical eye, here you have an example of a 2Kg felling axe. Top view, botton view and the profile,
    Jauregi 2Kg felling axe
    The hadle is conical too, so you have to insert the handle from the top.When they met you tight them by pressure and that’s it.
    Jauregi 2Kg felling axe
    The concept has centuries and it has been used by Basque and Scandinavinan. This has a backdraw, the handle can have any shape but it has to pass down the eye, this makes those axes some less ergonomical. But its has advantages, big ones. If you want to change the handle you have only have to hit or make pressure to the head from the top and they will come appart, it the head loosens hit it or make pressure from bottom and it will tighten and if your handle breaks it’s very easy to make a new handle by yourself. It doesn’t need any wedge, give to the new handle the same shape of the old one (or the same shape of the eye if you don’t have the broken handle), insert it from the top and hit or make pressure to the handle till it tightens. As you see it’s very simple, you don’t need any special tool to make a new handle, it can me made with a normal knife. In an emergency you can pick a branch, shape it with your knife and you have your handle done.

    #41697
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    I love axes and have restored quite a few vintage ones. This shape and style is one that I have seen a few times, but have yet to find one for sale.

    If I wanted to add one of these bad boys to my collection, where might I look?

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    #41700
    Profile photo of Ugaldie
    Ugaldie
    Survivalist
    member1

    It depends were do you life. If you life in western Europe the best option is to contact directly the maker, best way is to call him, send him an email if you don’t speak Spanish nor Basque,

    http://www.hachasartesanas.com

    It was very hard to get one of them internationally, there are weird laws in Spain in this concern. But a Finnish webpage has recently started selling them, photos are bad and they only have two models. You can ask them if they can help you to get the axe you want, stainless butcher axes are highly prized by hunters here,

    https://www.lamnia.com/en/sc/8/camping-and-outdoors/axes-and-saws?page=&mcid=&mid=505

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