Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 27 total)
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  • #38740
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    This link is to the Northwest Axe Company site. They have put up a good tutorial on proper methods of safely using an axe. On the page are two videos very worth watching titled: Alone in the Wilderness. The first is a documentary of building a log cabin without power tools. In the beginning of the video they have a short segment to show you the wilderness. The second video shows how to make wooden utensils.

    http://www.nwaxeco.com/pages/cut-with-care

    #38742
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    The videos are of, and made by Richard Proenneke, one of the last true backwoodsmen.

    The pay versions are worth every penny.

    #38837
    Profile photo of Blackbird
    Blackbird
    Survivalist
    member1

    How to Use Crosscut Saws, Axes, Etc.: “Handtools for Trail Work” Part 2 1999 US Forest Service

    #38838
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Thanks Blackbird that is an informative video. One of the safety methods they use and show is very good from a safety perspective and not so good ergonomically. Bending your knees while swinging an axe or sledgehammer will keep a person from hitting themselves in the foot or ankle but it will make accuracy much more difficult. Additionally a normal person won’t be able to work very long doing squats all day. Personally (use this method at your own risk) I like to use a wide stance, with one foot 90* from the cut or as close as posible to that line. The other foot back and to the side. Both feet are well away from the cut planted firmly, providing the best balance you can achive.

    He didn’t explain most injuries are caused from a glancing blow that goes wild bouncing of the material instead of making a cut. Accuracy over power every swing. Don’t use an axe if you’re tired or you’re hands or arms are tired.

    #38840
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    Alone in the Wilderness
    an interesting video of a man alone in the woods building his own place

    #38848
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    The Gransfors Bruks Axe book has a lot of good info. They also show an interesting way of stacking firewood. In a circle on branches off the ground. Keeping it sharp is the most important safety consideration. Dull axes are dangerous.

    #38857
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    Mors Kochanski also has several good videos out there on this subject. I also have several other good resources I can post when not on my phone.

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    #38858
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Mors Kochanski also has several good videos out there on this subject. I also have several other good resources I can post when not on my phone.

    I still want my cold steel Viking axe. I just don’t feel safe around the undead without it. lol

    #38863
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    Brulen

    considering that you live in New York where zombies and brain dead run amuck, I can see that.

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    #38864
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Mors Kochanski: How to use an axe:

    Thanks Sled

    #38866
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews
    #39062
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Make sure the axe head is well attached and will not fly off while you are chopping.
    Keeping the axe in a very low humidity environment in the winter will often lead to wood shrinkage.

    #39070
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Good point.

    #39089
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Thanks 74 and Blackbird, and I agree about Proenneke, that man and what he did (lived) was so true and real.

    #39094
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    Here is how you should care for your axes:

    Just soak the axe head in BLO every so often and keep the shaft well coated at the same time. BLO does wonders for wood. I personally took a bucket and some PVC pipe and made an axe bath out of it. I just slip the handle down the pipe and the head sits in the bucket then fill it full of BLO (boiled linseed oil) and let it sit for a while. Depending on how you attach the bucket, this little build can last you for years and keeps you from having to rehaft your axes every couple years in really dry places. Even if you don’t go as elaborate as a setup as I have, just put some BLO in a bucket and put the axe head in it to soak every few months as needed.

    http://ageofdecadence.com

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