Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
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  • #26882
    Profile photo of Tsar Alexander
    Tsar Alexander
    Survivalist
    member4

    The idea of Ebola turning into a pandemic struck me today. I think there is a good possibility that this might turn into a pandemic that could kill millions of people in America, and finally destroy our fragile society. While I don’t think it is certain that Ebola might turn into a pandemic, it now seems more than possible.

    With that in mind, I would like it if more senior survivalists could give me some advice on where I can improve my plans.

    So far, this past month, I have moved to the big city to attend college. Right now I live in a small apartment building with two other people I know. There is a third guy, but I am not so sure about him. One of the friends has a car. None of us own guns (thank you left wing run city council!). Not yet anyway.

    I have not had any chance to really plan yet. Maybe it was because I was lazy. Going onto Google maps briefly, I was breaking down some numbers in my head. I decided that in a real crisis, it is better to just abandon this place entirely, and head back to me and my friends small town which is not too far away by car (only a few hours). However, in SHTF, freeways might well be clogged, and gas might be low. We have plenty of family and contacts in our old town.

    I figured that if we had to make the total trip on foot, that it would take somewhere over 2 weeks, but less than a month, assuming we all can walk 6 miles a day. Ideally, in my plan, we would use our friends car to get us as far as possible using side roads, and once the car ran out of gas, or we encountered gridlock we could not go around, then we would ditch it and go on foot. On foot, we would try to sleep in abandoned buildings that we find. Ideally, we would attempt to skirt the cores of our metro area, and try and keep more towards the rural regions, keeping downtown’s as far away as possible (though, unfortunately, to make the journey at all, we would *have* to pass through at least one downtown). As we entered the rural areas far from the city, we would sleep at night in the forests using make shift structures.

    A major point in my plan is to avoid bridges at all costs. While this would greatly lengthen our trip, I have two assumptions in mind:

    In urban areas during SHTF, bridges would turn into shooting ranges for looters and hijackers.

    In rural areas, during SHTF, defensive locals might form miltia’s to try and block the outside world by blocking up bridges.

    Supplies will be a big issue. I am thinking of making homemade MRE’s and buying a canteen with iodine tablets. I don’t know exactly what I would pack in the MRE’s, but it would have to be small and light enough to fit at least 5 into an average sized school bag. I am thinking of buying lots of dried food and power bars since I will be damned if I will lug around a ton of cans.

    Realize I want to do this all on the cheap–I am just a student, and I don’t want to spend too much of my government money. That being said, I am thinking a food budget of 30 or so dollars for me, coupled with maybe another 10 to 30 dollars for everything else.

    So, fellow survivalists, what do you think of my plan, and where can I improve?

    #26884
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Tsar,
    You have a lot of topics to discuss in your post and it should generate an abundance of ideas. It’s not a straight forward proposition on how things will unfold if ebola gets into the population. For quite some time events wil be very random and you have time to figure things out.

    You should leave the city well before everything goes to shtf. Everyone will agree to that, it ensures you get to your destination safely and can use a car. Deciding what triggers your move is key. You have to stick with your plan or you will probably keep putting off the move until it’s to late.

    If it gets into the general public in any significant numbers so you can’t be certain if it’s safe to go into public places, you should not wait any longer for your own safety. If travel bans and restictions are imposed you will find it difficult to leave.

    About those bridges. It’s getting cold so swimming most rivers will be impossible. Even in the summer time it would be a challenge not worth the risk of drowning.

    #26885
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    You are on the right track. The whole thing about living in a city with millions of other people using the same water and food supply – and roads, is timing. Having a network of people that will notify each other of serious stuff happening in your area. Having a look at newspapers often – and then to trust your gut feeling. Getting out in time is very important.

    You need the three BBB (Beans, bullets, bandages) in your BOB

    One set of clothes, water bottle, knife, map, lighter, compass, small multi-tool, freez dried food, beef jerkey, protein bars. Small first aid kit with re-hydrate powder and gloves and mask.(if you are worried about a pandemic) Big plastic bags folded into very small Ziploc. Documents inside plastic bag. Money in small notes. Strong little bag with small gadgets like pocket tweezers, nail clippers, fishing line and hooks, Kevlar tread, lock-pick key, para cord etc) Leather Gloves. Small two way radio’s – that can also pick up normal radio stations. Milton tablets (water treatment)

    We’ve got high protein porridge here called Future life – Non GMO. http://www.futurelife.co.za/products/high-protein/ You may try to find something similar. Put some in plastic ziplock bags with a scoop on milk powder. You can mix water inside the bag and eat with spoon out of the bag. Also look at Cup a soup (no added MSG) sachets. Two minutes noodles. And off cause dark chocolate! Small plastic bottle with coconut oil. (Use as suntan lotion or food.)

    (just some quick thoughts.. for I need to go back to work : ) )

    #26890
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    Tsar, I believe in terms of Ebola we luckily have time. If this becomes a pandemic and the public panics Im pretty sure most of us are already at their safe locations. It still makes sense you think about your bug out plan but if Ebola is what you prepare for it is more important to think how you will live and how you will deal with situations when sick people show up at your safe location. How will you minimize contact with other people? How will you organize resupplies?

    If you are on a tight budget I recommend going the “rice and vitamins” way. It’s a bad way to survive but most likely you would survive and its pretty cheap. Poor people here in South East Asia get by on rice and whatever else they can find that’s green or an animal their whole life.

    You could also look into creating something like your own Soylent or BP-5 / NRG-5 which is pretty popular in European survival forums. You can read more about it here: https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.survivalforum.ch%2Fforum%2Fshowthread.php%2F1644-Bp5-Nrg5-K1000&edit-text=

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #26917
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Tsar, if your hometown is currently a couple hour drive away, even slower going on back roads should be able to get you there on a single tank of gas. The trick then is to get in the habit of filling the tank often, at a minimum filling it when it gets down to half but I’d suggest filling it when it gets down to 3/4’s. Once in the habit, doing this won’t seem odd at all. If the friend who owns the car however doesn’t see the same threats that you do, convincing him of the wisdom of full gas tanks could be tough. Another thing is to start driving the alternative routes so as to familiarize yourself with them. Every time you go home, use a different route. Not knowing whether the region you live in is mountainous or forested, if it is, then having topo maps could come in handy if you needed to go offroad in order to get around a town or other obstacle.

    The best solution of course is to head home before events hit the critical stage. A single day can make all the difference, sometimes even a few hours head start. You and your friends all need to be on the same page that when one of you says its time, its time and you head out.

    #26923
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Yep ,most important thing here is to GET OUT in time, it i can be matter of hours not days.
    I mean this hour you could go and get there with your car, be t if you late hour or two then it could be very long trip on foot, with lot of problems.
    Watch carefully how situation develops, and read “between the line” to recognize stage when they say “situation is hard but no need to panic…” or similar, that usually means that S. will hit the fan very soon.

    #26936
    Profile photo of Roadracer
    Roadracer
    Survivalist
    member7

    If your main concern is ebola, then I think you will have sufficient warning to bug out. Keep the car gassed, supplies handy, and your ear to the news. As Selco said, “situation is hard but no need to panic” the it is time to move. When you get home will you have support and will they be prepared to ride out the situation?

    #26938
    Profile photo of Tsar Alexander
    Tsar Alexander
    Survivalist
    member4

    Thank you all for the advice. I should be going to the store later today to pick some stuff up.

    As for what my “trigger” will be, I think I will finally leave when/if the first few cases of Ebola is reported in my city. If it appears in any of the neighboring states, I will also start to make the final preparations to leave.

    #26942
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Tsar, The Ebola will not end car travel, only an EMP attack or Sun flare will do that. So the thing you need to do is buy masks like the 3m n95 and gloves. If you need to travel home that is what you would use.
    If you think it will be a good idea to stay in place then you need to store some food. Rice and beans is cheap, Jay is right on that and add vitamins. A roll of duct tape to seal doors and windows would also be a good idea.

    #26952
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    You may have already… include battery radio in your BOB that receives police/emergency communications. Include (if you have smartphone) emergency communication app on your smartphone. Several to choose to from..I use mine to monitor police/emergency communicstions during bad storms or other ‘disasters’ in the area.

    #26955
    Profile photo of Tsar Alexander
    Tsar Alexander
    Survivalist
    member4

    For today on my shopping list, I have:

    Water purification tablets ( 1 vial of 50)
    Rice in small bags
    Some noodles
    a few power bars.

    I already own a couple of knives, a weird multiscrewdriver thing,and a hand crank radio/flashlight.

    #26971
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    Tsar, watch where you get your rice from, china is getting bad for arsenic, currently where I live there are no restrictions on arsenic in rice, but the canadian government put out a warning saying 1 cup of rice per week max.

    big hazard for baby food fyi, mostly made of rice.

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #26972
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    In regards to your original post, I really hope you consider going out and walking with a 20 pound back pack for 1-2 hours of walking per day, just in case you do end up walking.

    Maybe consider walking your escape route, going further and further the stronger you get.

    Hopefully you get out before that tho like the guys where saying.

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #26975
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Tsar, if you live in a cold climate, you might think about putting some good winter clothing on your Christmas wish list. As I noted on another thread just yesterday there is a big difference between going from a heated house to a heated car to a heated building than it is being out in the cold all day. Think feet, fingers, ears/head.

    #26980
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Good advice MtBiker. I like to keep my middle warm to though. Coveralls or insulated pants & long coat. Layers. Water proof barriers.

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