Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
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  • #48197
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Hello Everyone. You probably see I am writing more articles now and also getting trusted friends to write some articles too.

    It would be great to hear some ideas and suggestions on what articles you would like to read?

    Please make some suggestions in this thread.

    Thank you.
    Selco.

    #48202
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Hello Everyone. You probably see I am writing more articles now and also getting trusted friends to write some articles too.

    It would be great to hear some ideas and suggestions on what articles you would like to read?

    Please make some suggestions in this thread.

    Thank you.
    Selco.

    Sup big guy?

    I got one for you. How did older folks get by during your time in the f***-barrel?

    Perfect SHTF scenario is everyone is a fit 20-something with some pretty good skills, heavily armed, ideally located and well supplied…

    Reality says that a lot – if not most of us – are going to be in our 40’s with folks in their 60’s and 70’s (probably family) under our care and protection, not ideally located, poorly provisioned and wanting in some area of training….

    So, I would like to see an article dedicated to the older generation – those who have some serious life skills, but are decades past their prime and probably have to rely on others to an extent to get by. How they did it, what they had to do, how they coped (or not), what they could or could not do, how they fared, etc..

    You mentioned once a long time ago that – no matter how much of a badass you thought you were, there was some old grandpa with a left-over rifle from WWII who didn’t care anymore and would drop you, no problem. Or something to that effect. My gut tells me what you said is more true that not and very likely happened. You probably even saw it happen.

    Which tells me the older generation played a bigger, more important part in your time in SHTF-land than I originally suspected…

    Thanks much… keep em coming.

    Mal

    Edit: Perhaps an interview or two from older folks who were there who survived. I know they’d be quite old by now, but I think it would be an invaluable resource.

    Thanks again.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 6 months ago by Malgus Malgus.
    • This reply was modified 2 years, 6 months ago by Malgus Malgus.
    #48205
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Great idea Malgus. I’m rapidly approaching 63 and while in better shape compared to most guys my age, I am past my prime for sure. My wife of 40 years on the other hand has too many health and fitness issues for bugging out anywhere to be an issue. We are where we are. I took that into account back when we moved here.

    #48207
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    MB

    I have it on reliable authority that old age begins at 85 these days. Actually though I think it’s more like 90. Look at the Rolling Stones.

    From my perspective there is no time limit on acquiring new skills. Going stagnant is dangerously stupid in this world.

    #48209
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Brulen, its not a matter of going stagnant but rather one of physical aging. I can’t run as far or as fast as I could 25 years ago. I can’t lift as much weight or move as fast. I’ll be exhausted after a day of physical labor now. 25 years ago I wouldn’t have. As I said I’m in pretty good shape for my age and I exercise (both aerobic and strength) almost every day at a fitness club in town, but I’ll never again be what I was 25 years ago. Fortunately the brain hasn’t begun to dim yet and I can still learn new things. Also fortunately I am not on any medications. That will be a huge problem for older folks should they wake up one day and the pharmacies are all closed. For most people getting older is a negative come most SHTF scenarios.

    #48211
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I also think it is a good area to write since I am 58 but my father is 86 and mother is 84 so when the SHTF I have to take care of them. I do have my son 16 years old now so he is strong but need to learn a lot still.

    Like MB I am slowly losing what I was able to do when I was in my 30’s and 40’s.

    #48214
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Thank you very much friends for suggestions, will work on that!

    #48219
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    MB, Brulen, Free, Selco, etc..

    I’m no spring chicken either…

    Yeah, I still have my military chops, but as far as aging is concerned – it ain’t the years, it’s the mileage. I was hard on my body when I was young. Now, I’m paying for that. 48 years young, but I carry enough injuries for half a dozen people… I got one, maybe two good fights left in me – and I know it. My days of creepin’ and peepin’ in the boonies are pretty much long gone. I’ll do it if I really have to, but I don’t know how far I’ll get and I’ll sure as hell hate it – I like my comfy couch, hot coffee and waking up NOT soaking wet after 4 hours of sleep and “oh by the way it’s your turn to pull watch…” Or humping a ruck all day. As far as I’m concerned, I earned it.

    But “earn” and “deserve” got nothing to do with it. Things go sideways in a hurry, well, I can either bug out to God knows where (my current Plan B is “Head that way” or something like that…) or I can plunk my butt down right here for the duration. Which is why we bought this place in the first place – we are already bugged out and the rest of the world just has to catch up with us…

    My father is now passed on. The Lord took him last year. Mamma yet survives and is in reasonably good shape for her age, but still needs a minder around – a role filled by my brother. They are both welcome at the Doomstead and they know it. My son is coming of age and will be pulling more responsibility around the farm, though he doesn’t know it yet. Heh…

    We’re not doing too badly, but the question remains: What happens when “old people” meet “SHTF”? I don’t classify myself as “old” – probably delusion brought on by old age, ironically – but I can see “old” from where I am right now… be nice to know what’s coming… or at least a way of dealing with it that does not rely on being a boat anchor to everyone around me…

    Peace.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 6 months ago by Malgus Malgus.
    #48225
    Profile photo of Roadracer
    Roadracer
    Survivalist
    member7

    One of the challenges of aging is your shooting skills. After my last prescription change to trifocals, I got a chance to head to the range for some practice. What an eye opener. (pun intended) The consistent groups that I was used to were gone. Moving and sighting with my trusty M&P 9MM my shots were all over the place. Standing still even required extra concentration.

    With a enough practice the shooting came back to acceptable, but diminished eyesight will be one of the challenges as we age in a SHTF scenario.

    Any insight you might have on the senses – eyesight, hearing, etc. and how people handled them would be helpful. My concern is that on a diet that is less than healthy during a SHTF all the senses will deteriorate.

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 6 months ago by Profile photo of Roadracer Roadracer.
    #48237
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    I have it on reliable authority that old age begins at 85 these days. Actually though I think it’s more like 90.

    I would very much appreciate it if you could convey that to my body. It isn’t listening to the part of my brain that is still in denial.

    #48250
    Profile photo of L Tecolote
    L Tecolote
    Survivalist
    member8

    Talk about moving the goalposts! I had it on authority from my my Dad, that if I lived long enough, I’d be an old man, and from my Grandpa, that I could legitimately consider myself old at 80. I was looking forward to being able to claim that distinction in less than five more years. Now, it looks as if I’ll have to hang on for another ten (or is it now fifteen?) Dang!

    Oh, well … in for a penny, in for a pound. ;-) To paraphrase the late Mantan Moreland, “knees, don’t fail me now!” I need this next topic more than ever.

    Cry, "Treason!"

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 6 months ago by Profile photo of L Tecolote L Tecolote.
    #48254
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Selco,
    Although you have mentioned the first stages of collapse, I’d like more perspective of your current thinking regarding recognizing the first stages and transition into total civil failure. Additionaly what type of man-made event would trigger your bugout?

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 6 months ago by Profile photo of 74 74.
    #48257
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Aging and the survivalist is definitely a subject worth study. I know I can’t do things I could do 20 years ago.

    But how about some out of the box subjects.

    There have been thousands of BOB articles and lists.
    Same for what to put back in storage for tomorrow.

    How about inexpensive, low calorie (burned not gathered) food procurement.
    Be it trot lines, jug fishing, roadkill gathering, the “taking” of game in emergencies (note I did not say hunting) gleaning from fields, and those things that hide in the grey areas of life.

    How about the non-romantic day to day survival information that makes living in the “decline” or a collapse easier.

    #48492
    RROAMM
    RROAMM
    Survivalist
    member2

    I would like to see more articles written from a women’s perspective. I think that the women in the group would benefit from real life experiences that happened during your time in hell. I know, I would. It may also help some family members that are on the fence. I feel most prepping is drive from a male perspective and seeing it from a female perspective would help us be better prepared.

    #48493
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    RROAMM, good idea. In case you haven’t seen them, there are a few already here. Just as one (not to slight the others), you might want to go back and look at Leopard’s posts in the South Africa thread. She does into some detail about what she’s experienced, particularly a a single mom, what protections she’s got in place, etc. And if you know some women with the background to write some good posts, please invite them to join us and post in the appropriate topics/threads.

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