Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 32 total)
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  • #42934
    Toby C
    Toby C
    Survivalist
    member6

    It is an accepted theory when ‘bugging out’ you may have to abandon your vehicle due to breakdown, congestion, disrupted roads etc. However, we can’t eliminate there maybe a chance further along in your journey to acquire a new mode of transport.

    How many different vehicles and transportation methods are you competent in? Can you drive a car, truck, boat, motorbike? Can you ride a bike, snowmobile, jet ski, horse…?

    I’m not saying you have to be fully licensed, but do you feel confident you can access, start and stop a variety of different transport options. How many are you familiar with?

    #42945
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Toby,
    Your topic is important for anyone that believes they may need to bug out. People should know some of the most basic elements of maintenance for each type of vehicle. I recently heard a figure for the persentage of people that couldn’t change a tire. The number was extraordinarily high.

    #42946
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    The VC moved thousands of tons of supplies with a bicycle during Vietnam .

    #42948
    Toby C
    Toby C
    Survivalist
    member6

    74 – Yes, peoples lack of fundamental vehicle knowledge is exceptionally concerning. Some of these things I wouldn’t even call ‘mechanics’, just real basics, checking fluid levels, pressures etc.

    Tolik – Yes, many are addicted to motors, but a lot (sometimes even a better result) can be achieved with even simple vehicles. I remember reading about troops training in ‘Mule Handling’ in N.Afghanistan, as it was the only ‘vehicle’ that could work in certain regions of their operational area…

    #42950
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Toby,
    When you get into alternative vehicles, motorcycles, boats, trucks, tractors or whatever. The most basic knowledge would be; know what type of fuel to use. Is it a 4 stoke, a 2 stroke or a diesel. Many engines have been destroyed by using the wrong fuel.

    #42951
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Tolik,
    I like the idea of using bikes for load carrying as well. If I was going to dedicate a bike for that purpose it would really help to make a saddle bag to fit the bike frame. Taking the pedals off would make it much easier to push so your not banging your ankles and shins on them or working to avoid them all the time.

    #42952
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Good topic. Even those of us who have no plans to bug out on account we have nowhere to go and/or other impediments to bugging out could find ourselves far from home when the SHTF.

    74, could you elaborate on which alternative vehicles use which fuel? As an aside, my method of never getting things mixed up is equipment that uses a gas-oil mix is kept on one side of the garage along with those gas containers and all of the regular gas equipment is kept on the other side of the garage with their gas containers. There cannot be any accidental mix ups that way.

    On the matter of bicycles, if you are going to have a bicycle for these purposes I recommend you consider one of those newer old fashioned bikes that have fatter tires and no gears/shifting or disc or hydraulic brakes. At issue is maintenance. Bent derailleurs cannot be fixed. Trust me I know. Disc & hydraulic brakes wear out and whereas brake pads are somewhat easy to replace (if you happen to have replacements and the tools to do the replacement) you can find yourself with an unusable bike if other brake components break while you are out on the road. Fatter tires require more effort pedaling on paved roads but your bug out journey will have far more options if you are not restricted to paved roads. Simple is better in this regard. Also, you absolutely get what you pay for when it comes to bikes. What is being sold in the discount stores is of decidedly less quality/durability than what you get at a bike shop, even if ostensibly the same brand. A good bike shop will also help make sure that the bike you are buying fits you and your body geometry. Any bike can feel OK doing a test spin around the parking lot. A bike with a proper fit will feel good if riding hours and hours, but you’ll know soon enough if the bike doesn’t have a proper fit.

    #42955
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    It may not be much of an issue for most of the people on this forum but being able to drive a stick shift is another skill that comes to mind. If you know where the clutch and gearshift are and have a basic knowledge of RPMs to clutch engagement there aren’t too many vehicles you won’t be able to drive. What if you wind up on foot and stumble across the only running vehicle and that vehicle happens to be a dump truck. Could you drive it?

    #42957
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB,
    Your question gets to the root of my comment, because all vehicles usually have 2 options. Although in the US diesel passenger cars are not common they do exist. It’s quite common on the other hand for pickup trucks to be diesel powered. Trucks up to 26,000 lbs can be either. These are your basic straight truck. Most trucks over 26,000 use diesels.

    All most all motorcycles designed for the street are 4 stroke gasoline engines, however there are a few antique (70s vintage) 2 strokes. Dirt bikes can be either 2 stroke and 4 stroke, both are made today. In the ATV world there are both gas and diesel models.

    Small power boats with outboard motors could be either 2 or 4 stroke. Newer motors are predominantly 4 stroke. Boats with inboard engines can be either gasoline or diesel.

    If gasoline is run through diesel engines they can explode create fires and cause serious injury.

    #42958
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    74, so how do we tell the difference?

    #42959
    Profile photo of L Tecolote
    L Tecolote
    Survivalist
    member8

    Manufacturers of outboard engines, usually place a warning decal stating, if gasoline needs to be mixed with oil, what the proper ratio is. More at:http://tinyurl.com/nf2f8jv

    A gasoline engine will have flexible electrical cables going to the spark plugs in the cylinders. Diesels have non-flexible steel tubes plumbed into each cylinder. Also, the scent of diesel fuel is different from that of gasoline. Diesel engines, when not warmed up, usually need a brief (10-30 second) warm-up for the glow plugs. This is usually the position on the ignition key switch, just shy of cranking the starter motor.

    Not only will gasoline ruin a diesel engine, but diesel will mess up a gasoline engine as well — it won’t vaporize to make the explosive mixture with air needed to fire by spark. That mistake can be remedied, but in a G.O.O.D. situation, you won’t won’t have time to clean out the fuel system.

    Cry, "Treason!"

    #42970
    Toby C
    Toby C
    Survivalist
    member6

    Then you have to throw in Ethanol, bio fuels, LPG options etc. So ‘driving a car’, suddenly breaks down into automatic or manual (US you’d say automatic or stick, I think?) Petrol, diesel or alternative fuel? (My friends landrover runs on cooking oil…) and that’s just one mode of transport…

    Is riding a horse the same as riding a mule?

    Are gear boxes and transmissions universal on motorbikes?

    What vehicles have ‘Kill switches’ and do you know how they operate…?

    My wife can ride a camel and an elephant but struggles with pedal bikes… I’m fine on bikes, but have no clue on elephants or camels…

    Some really great comments on this thread, thanks everyone, this is a very interesting discussion for me :)

    #42972
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Horses and donkeys are an age old form of transport , but they are much harder to find in the modern day ……..then there is the care of the animal , which may be a bigger burden than we realize .

    #42973
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Toby,
    You’d have to run into a European bike made before the 1980’s to have the shifter and rear brake switched sides from the current universal system, shifter on the left side, rear brake on the right side. Almost universal is first gear one down, then 2,3,4 and 5 up. Shifting down is 5 down and one back up for neutral. The clutch is always on the left side of the handlebar and the front brake one the right side. (This is true even on backward configured Brit bikes from pre 80’s)

    #42981
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Good topic Toby!
    Personally I learnt to “operate” lot of different types of transportation, trucks, cars, smaller boats, bus and similar.
    For example it looks easy to operate small rubber boat with small “outside” engine, but if you are not familiar with it you can end up crashing it very easy instead of “docking”, even in very very slow speeds.
    So it make sense to try everything while you have chance.

    I admit my knowledge is pretty much basic when it comes to maintenance of different vehicles, while it is pretty good for short distances and solving small problems.

    Bike is cool tool for survival, even only for help in carrying loads.

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