Viewing 9 posts - 16 through 24 (of 24 total)
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  • #25039
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Brulen the 3M® HEPA Mask will work better, I got my 3M® HEPA Mask at Amazon for a total of $25. The link is

    http://www.amazon.com/3M-7182-3M%C2%AE-HEPA-Mask/dp/B0006FMK0W

    #25045
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    A real respirator like the one Freedom has a link to will work under most condition. The valves in the mask prevent used air and moisture from exiting through the filter elements. The filters will need replacement after every use.

    Decontamination of the mask without exposing yourself touching the filters and mask should be planned ahead of use.

    #25062
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Agree you will have to decontaminate everything you wear. The problem will be the airborne viruses that will be everywhere so decontamination will be hard.

    If there is an airborne virus we will have to bug in our houses till the all clear happens. Buy the best A/C filters , make sure your windows and doors don’t let air in, store all your food and water inside your home, have your extra water filter inside your home and filter all water, have other ways of cooking inside like a gas range, they sale the small ones. The electricity may go down and if you do not have a way to cook you will have to go outside.

    I like the idea of having paper plates and cups so I use them and burn them in the fireplace. Medicines, make sure you have what you need, also have ibuprofen, acetaminophen, a very good multi-vitamin, all the ones that have shown that they may do something to slow down a virus like echinacea, vitamin c, zinc, and eat well.

    All viruses go to war with our immune system so we need to make sure it is as strong as possible.

    Remember that airborne viruses go into your body though the nose, mouth or eyes so cleaning your hands a lot will help. Try not to touch your eyes or putting your hands in your mouth.

    #25064
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    This fits the spread of ebola. It doesn’t need to mutate.

    “A more appropriate question might be how long can a virus stay airborne? This can be answered if the size of the specific viral organism is known and how much weight it has to affect the ability of the respiratory droplet containing it to stay afloat on air currents produced by the cough or sneeze. Usually, especially for cold and flu viruses, this is only a matter of seconds and for a diameter of six feet from the person who coughs or sneezes and produces the respiratory droplets, otherwise, they fall from the air to land on surfaces in that approximate 6 foot area.”

    http://www.answers.com/Q/How_long_can_a_cold_virus_live_in_the_air

    #25076
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Also 74 is the question of how long does the virus live on a surface after it fulls from the air. Some viruses last for days and some die in minutes or hours. This is a very important question since many will cough or sneeze in there hands and then touch a door or desk and the virus is there for someone else to touch.

    #25077
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    The way it is I try to never touch anything in public places. I use the back of my hand when i have to push on an emergency door opener, and I look for a high spot that is not used near the top of the door any other time. Pulling doors open is a problem because you must use the handle. I never touch a railing or anything other people can reach. paying on a key pad is another problem area. If things go bad and I must go out I was thinking of carrying plastic wrap to use as a disposable covers. Use them and let them drop to the floor.

    #25080
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Thought you ebola guys would find this interesting:

    “SURVIVAL OUTSIDE HOST: Filoviruses have been reported capable to survive for weeks in blood and can also survive on contaminated surfaces, particularly at low temperatures (4°C) Footnote 52 Footnote 61. One study could not recover any Ebolavirus from experimentally contaminated surfaces (plastic, metal or glass) at room temperature Footnote 61. In another study, Ebolavirus dried onto glass, polymeric silicone rubber, or painted aluminum alloy is able to survive in the dark for several hours under ambient conditions (between 20 and 250C and 30–40% relative humidity) (amount of virus reduced to 37% after 15.4 hours), but is less stable than some other viral hemorrhagic fevers (Lassa) Footnote 53. When dried in tissue culture media onto glass and stored at 4 °C, Zaire ebolavirus survived for over 50 days Footnote 61. This information is based on experimental findings only and not based on observations in nature. This information is intended to be used to support local risk assessments in a laboratory setting.”

    It’s from here

    #25095
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Thanks Tweva,

    #25097
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    That is good information. So it looks like heat will kill it as very cold does too.

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