Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
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  • #5830
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Would anyone want to know how I use acorns? From harvesting them (in Oklahoma but applicable elsewhere) to using in breads/frycakes?

    #5832
    anika
    anika
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    This is from one of my favorite sites, and is very comprehensive.

    http://grandpappy.org/racorns.htm

    #5836
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Thanks, Anika! He has covered most everything! Wish I had the link a year ago, since I had to discover a lot for myself. Found a big Burr Oak (white oak family) with huge acorns nearby and enjoyed harvesting and eating the fruits. Very plentiful and nutritious.

    #5838
    anika
    anika
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    You are welcome! He made it all sound so appealing, that I wish we had some oaks around here! :)

    #5874
    Ghost
    Ghost
    Survivalist
    member3

    When I first got into “survivalism” I had a notion to study the Native Americans they survived in some pretty harsh climates which lead to my discovery of Acorns as a food source (here’s a link some might find useful as my book is hardcopy): http://www.thepeoplespaths.net/NAIFood/acorns.htm

    I know acorns were used as a coffee substitute in WW2 and there’s a Ray Mears episode of him making acorn porridge (which is actually pretty disgusting).

    Would love to see your recipes though wildartist.

    If at first you don't succeed, excessive force is usually the answer.

    #6043
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    I know it takes a bit of work to make them edible , but they have been harvested for 100’s of years . Other than that , I have never tried .

    #6461
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Actually, Tolik, the work is not as arduous as people think. Once you hull them (easier than most nuts), chop them coarsely, and leach them in three changes of boiling water (follow directions in the link provided by anika), they are ready to use in recipes. A 5-gallon bucket took about a day of work–much better return than many wild harvests. I liked them best in Apache Cakes (equal parts of acorn grits and cornmeal, plus a tablespoon or so of honey, enough water to make a thick paste, fried in a little oil–can be cooked on a hot stone if necessary) or added a cupful of grits to multigrain bread–delicious and satisfying. Unlike many processed foods, acorns give you a satisfied, nourished feeling after eating them. And they are very dense in carbs and oils, hard to get in survival situations.

    #6478
    anika
    anika
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    That does sound pretty easy… and man do those Apache Cakes sound good, thank you for sharing that! Glad it went well!

    #6485
    Darin Prentice
    Darin Prentice
    Survivalist
    member4

    excellent post. copy’d them recipe’s. thanks for the link.i look forward to trying it out.

    Prepare, Preserve, Protect...

    #6630
    anika
    anika
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Oh hey, that other thread about barter items reminded me of one more use…Acorn Wine! :)

    http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/acorn.asp

    #8997
    Profile photo of pdh8447
    pdh8447
    Survivalist
    member1

    Sadly Oaks don’t grow in Alaska or I’d give this a try.

    #9013
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    No they don’t, but you have tons of berries in the fall. I used to go out with the Native women from our village (Nenana) and pick, and pick, and pick. Miss them (both the friends and the berries.) Also the moose and salmon. When we moved back to the Lower 48, beef tasted weird, soft and mushy.

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