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  • #50746
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    The election of The Donald was indeed YUUGE, and it seems that – with his election – a great many people think we are “out of the woods” and that The Donald will fix everything and thus, they rolled over and went to sleep.

    Umm… not really, no.

    Our debt load of $20T is still there, with $200T in unfunded liabilities.
    The Fed, the EBC and their Bankster toadies are still up to their machinations.
    Markets are still laughably over-valued.
    Openly hostile invaders still swarm into the West by their millions.
    War still rages in Sandland, Trashcanistan and other fun vacation spots.
    The Deep State is still bent on having Putin as our Boogeyman, regardless of the reality of the situation.
    O-Hole can still do a tremendous amount of damage before January 20th.
    More and worse…

    If there is a bright spot in any of this, its that those of us who realize that yes, Something Wicked This Way Comes – we won’t have to pay premium prices for supplies because overall demand has fallen. I am taking advantage of the situation.

    Surprisingly, the Left has suddenly realized that they have spent the last 8 years weaponizing the US Government, and now the keys have been handed to The Donald. That this was a possibility never entered into their consciousness. I think we give them too much credit. But, now that The Donald is going to be in the driver’s seat, they’re in Crisis Mode. In short, a great many of them “hat die Hosen beshißen” and are now looking seriously into things that have been the sole province of us Preppers (who are way more right and center right than they care to be), and thus they have avoided seriously discussing things we discuss on a regular basis.

    However, I have little confidence in their abilities… yes, everyone has to start somewhere – but having been “on the trail” for years (some of us decades) and we’re STILL NOT DONE – well… I don’t hold out hope for them.

    Interesting take on the situation: http://www.infowars.com/trumpocalypse-suddenly-liberals-are-the-ones-stockpiling-food-guns-and-emergency-supplies/

    It’s Infowars, so take it with a grain of salt… or a bucket… as you see fit.

    All we have gained with the election of The Donald is 4 years – hopefully 8 – of wiggle room. That’s it. Very likely less, since even as President, he has little control over the global economy. It will do as it sees fit – good or bad – and what anyone – even The Donald – thinks or does be damned…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #50748
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    I look at the rise of the liberal prepper per se as more a knee jerk reaction to what they believed would never happen.

    I can’t see this lasting any longer than the post-Katrina prepping did.
    It’s not in their nature or methodology to be self reliant.

    #50754
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Trump being elected is called HOPE . Its been a long time sense Conservatives had hope . Will it pan out ? Time will tell . Do we let our guard down ? No . Continue to prep ? Yes , but the difference here is that firearms , for at least one term in office , will not be under siege , leaving us in a better position to concentrate money and effort into other areas .

    #50757
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Sadly, that’s be exactly the opposite of the planning and gathering that we need to be doing.

    Depending on if it’s 4 or 8 years, the time frame is immaterial, we will see a pushback from the libtards unless T has the ability to truly turn everything around, even in their eyes.

    That can start as soon as two years from now, locally, if not sooner.
    Kommiefornia is already looking at a complete ban on all magazines over 10 rounds, and now a possibility of a total ban on semi auto rifles..

    Now is the time to solidify our plans, gathering the items that are going to be top of the hit list.
    Receivers, magazines, bolt carrier groups, etc.

    This is a temporary reprieve, act accordingly.

    Especially with the possibility of the muzzies rising up and making their fetid presence known.

    • This reply was modified 10 months ago by Whirlibird Whirlibird.
    #50760
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Sadly, that’s be exactly the opposite of the planning and gathering that we need to be doing.

    Depending on if it’s 4 or 8 years, the time frame is immaterial, we will see a pushback from the libtards unless T has the ability to truly turn everything around, even in their eyes.

    That can start as soon as two years from now, locally, if not sooner.
    Kommiefornia is already looking at a complete ban on all magazines over 10 rounds, and now a possibility of a total ban on semi auto rifles..

    Now is the time to solidify our plans, gathering the items that are going to be top of the hit list.
    Receivers, magazines, bolt carrier groups, etc.

    This is a temporary reprieve, act accordingly.

    Especially with the possibility of the muzzies rising up and making their fetid presence known.

    I tend to agree – this is just wiggle room. War ain’t over – only one battle.

    Folks forget the Libtard mantra: never let a crisis go to waste. They will push anything and everything under the sun precisely because The Donald is in office. They know it will all fail, but they will turn even their defeats into political traction (ie: “see how those uncompromising Repukes stall and block our common-sense legislation?”… think of the CHIILLLLDDRENNN!”).

    But stockpiling pieces parts?

    I will stockpile what I can use and will be investing in machine tools in the coming year. Mill. Lathe. Surface grinder. Etc… With everything going CNC, manual machines – top of the line, world class machines – are going for peanuts. A perfectly good Series 1 Bridgeport with all the trimmings will only set you back the cost of two Colt 6920’s (plus EOTech 552’s and the magnifiers), and that’s with a DRO thrown in.

    A South Bend geared head engine lathe (16″ swing x 40″) will run you about the same.

    So, for between $10K to $12K, you can get two machines that can literally make your heart’s desire.

    Not even kidding.

    If it’s made of steel (or pretty much any metal, or even wood for that matter) and you can imagine it, then you can make it. Anything. In fact, a geared head engine lathe is one of the few machines that can duplicate itself – you can partially duplicate your lathe with your lathe, then use the partially completed lathe to complete itself. How about that for versatility?

    Why invest in pieces parts when I can invest in the things that can MAKE the pieces parts in unlimited quantity and top shelf quality?

    Add in a surface grinder, heat treat oven, drill press… maybe even a small rocket forge for smelting/melting metals and a beehive one for making crucible steel…

    Good times, man.. :)

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #50761
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Malgus I agree, but for most those reading this, I would hazard a guess that those tools are both beyond their ability to use and or store.

    That $10-12K for tools/machines, for you or I, is one thing.

    For most, a couple of parts kits, a couple of receivers, a couple of long winter evenings, viola.

    Leaving $8K to put back water, food, medical supplies and more.

    Heck, I don’t want to spend the time carving out a lower when they are available cheap. My time is better spent working on other things.

    I’m looking at these as insurance items, against the possibility of need. Not a couple tons of scrap in the shed taking up valuable space and cash.

    This isn’t about what we can do.

    #50767
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Thats where our choice of firearms makes a difference . There is a reason that all the freedom fighters , insurgents , and guerillas around the world are using either the AK , or the FAL . They rarely break , and are not fussy by nature . Are they the best ? No , but they will most likely keep you alive by not letting you down . ARs are good weapons , BUT they are on the needy side , in comparison . AR guys accept this and plan accordingly , but it is a consideration . ” The best ” is always up for debate , a SCAR 17 would most likely be better than all above , but its expensive . ” Good enough ” is what I’m after . AKs with a good barrel fit that role nicely .FALs are one of the best general purpose rifles around IMHO .

    #50768
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Again, agree on the utility of the FAL and AK.

    But for the tinkerer and garage builder, both require tooling (more expense) and skills beyond the average.

    Something a person with hand tools can build easily. Something with all US made parts, so you’re not dependent upon a foreign factory or used parts kit.

    As for the use around the world, the AK was given away by the Russians for so many years, better or for not they’re everywhere.
    The FAL and G3? Sold heavily to anti-commies everywhere, again they’re already there.

    Like it or not, it fills the bill nicely. After 50+ years, it’s still an effective rifle, being upgraded and improved, and most shooters (and even some liberals) have them.

    #50769
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Malgus I agree, but for most those reading this, I would hazard a guess that those tools are both beyond their ability to use and or store.

    That $10-12K for tools/machines, for you or I, is one thing.

    For most, a couple of parts kits, a couple of receivers, a couple of long winter evenings, viola.

    Leaving $8K to put back water, food, medical supplies and more.

    Heck, I don’t want to spend the time carving out a lower when they are available cheap. My time is better spent working on other things.

    I’m looking at these as insurance items, against the possibility of need. Not a couple tons of scrap in the shed taking up valuable space and cash.

    This isn’t about what we can do.

    Heh..

    You really see those things as “a couple tons of scrap in the shed, taking up valuable space and cash”?

    I see them as an investment for the future. And ‘beyond their ability to use or store”… anyone wanting a small tabletop version of either can get them for a pittance. The basics can be learned in a day. I only cited the big machines because I can do the most with them. Small machines are very capable, portable and run on household current…

    Each to his own.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #50770
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    True enough , but both AKs and FALs are now being 100% made in America , so reliance on foreign parts kits is a choice , rather than a necessity .

    #50771
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Malgus I agree, but for most those reading this, I would hazard a guess that those tools are both beyond their ability to use and or store.

    That $10-12K for tools/machines, for you or I, is one thing.

    For most, a couple of parts kits, a couple of receivers, a couple of long winter evenings, viola.

    Leaving $8K to put back water, food, medical supplies and more.

    Heck, I don’t want to spend the time carving out a lower when they are available cheap. My time is better spent working on other things.

    I’m looking at these as insurance items, against the possibility of need. Not a couple tons of scrap in the shed taking up valuable space and cash.

    This isn’t about what we can do.

    Heh..

    You really see those things as “a couple tons of scrap in the shed, taking up valuable space and cash”?

    I see them as an investment for the future. And ‘beyond their ability to use or store”… anyone wanting a small tabletop version of either can get them for a pittance. The basics can be learned in a day. I only cited the big machines because I can do the most with them. Small machines are very capable, portable and run on household current…

    Each to his own.

    As I said, for most reading this.
    And they’re going to learn how to carve out a lower in a day? Climb cutting? Tool speeds in various metals?

    Time and money better spent elsewhere for most.

    Merry Christmas to you and yours.

    • This reply was modified 10 months ago by Whirlibird Whirlibird.
    #50775
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    True enough , but both AKs and FALs are now being 100% made in America , so reliance on foreign parts kits is a choice , rather than a necessity .

    .

    I have yet to see a parts kit out of Century or DDI for the AK.
    And getting FAL parts made in the US, that aren’t Tapco junk? That are affordable?

    Much as I like the FAL, it’s not practical for most to build just like the AK.

    Merry Christmas to you and yours.

    #50777
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Malgus I agree, but for most those reading this, I would hazard a guess that those tools are both beyond their ability to use and or store.

    That $10-12K for tools/machines, for you or I, is one thing.

    For most, a couple of parts kits, a couple of receivers, a couple of long winter evenings, viola.

    Leaving $8K to put back water, food, medical supplies and more.

    Heck, I don’t want to spend the time carving out a lower when they are available cheap. My time is better spent working on other things.

    I’m looking at these as insurance items, against the possibility of need. Not a couple tons of scrap in the shed taking up valuable space and cash.

    This isn’t about what we can do.

    Heh..

    You really see those things as “a couple tons of scrap in the shed, taking up valuable space and cash”?

    I see them as an investment for the future. And ‘beyond their ability to use or store”… anyone wanting a small tabletop version of either can get them for a pittance. The basics can be learned in a day. I only cited the big machines because I can do the most with them. Small machines are very capable, portable and run on household current…

    Each to his own.

    As I said, for most reading this.
    And they’re going to learn how to carve out a lower in a day? Climb cutting? Tool speeds in various metals?

    Merry Christmas to you and yours.

    “And they’re going to learn how to carve out a lower in a day? Climb cutting? Tool speeds in various metals?”

    Playing the Reductio ad absurdum and Strawman card?

    I thought you didn’t fool with argument and logic fallacies. I see I was wrong.

    I never said they could carve out a lower in a day. Or climbing cuts or what speeds you should use with certain metals… YOU just did, then pretended I said it, then rebutted your own argument.

    Rebutting an argument nobody made – Strawman.

    And morphing “the basics can be learned in a day” to all the above? A variant on Reductio Ad Absurdum. Of course it’s absurd to think that any Joe Schlubby can learn how to do all the above in one day… and I never said anything of the sort.

    You really want to keep at this, Whirl? I was in a good mood, but you’re testing my famous patience.

    The basics – which I will spell out just because you want to play Stupid Games and Win Stupid Prizes – such as which levers and buttons do what, speed control, how to set up a machine and zero out your workpiece, etc – even basic screw cutting – can be learned in ONE DAY.

    Advanced skills come with time and practice – such as carving out a M-Forgery Lower, making your own cutting tools and accessory tooling, etc..

    Merry Christmas.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #50782
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    My patience also.
    Please don’t put the wrong words in my mouth and assume what I said is automatically incorrect.

    We are talking about non dedicated people.
    Not machinists in training.

    I’m looking at this from the perspective of the athletic director across the street, the construction engineer on the corner, the 4 teachers around the neighborhood.

    They all hunt, they all put firewood and food back, they all are “preppers” but have zero interest in how to build stuff from scratch let alone having more stuff in their garages.

    How do I know? I’ve talked with my neighbors and helped with a couple of builds for several.

    Just like auto mechanics, same people may have the tools and even the knowledge but still take their car to a mechanic for anything but the basics.

    Not everyone has the inclination or desire to hack their own out especially when they still have to make a life for themselves today.

    I’m done.

    #50786
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    My patience also.
    Please don’t put the wrong words in my mouth and assume what I said is automatically incorrect.

    You take what I am saying to some absurd conclusion, then tell me to not put the wrong words in your mouth, then tell me I am assuming what you are saying is automatically incorrect.

    Yeah, okay. (/sarc)

    I said OUR OPINIONS DIFFER. Because they do.

    But, at what point did I say you were wrong? (Sorry – “incorrect”). At what point did I put words in your mouth? Go ahead and quote me freely – cite chapter and verse – I got time and I won’t touch a thing.

    We are talking about non dedicated people.
    Not machinists in training.

    No, YOU are talking about those people and assuming that I mean the same thing. Learning how to competently operate a Bridgeport or a South Bend takes no more “dedication” than learning how to successfully and competently operate a motor vehicle.

    I said “competently” – not “expertly”.

    I will concede the point – in the interest of peace during this season – that those machines are big and scary looking and most people look at them like they just crash-landed from another galaxy. But, the fact is that they are no more difficult to learn how to use than your average automobile.

    I’m looking at this from the perspective of the athletic director across the street, the construction engineer on the corner, the 4 teachers around the neighborhood.

    They all hunt, they all put firewood and food back, they all are “preppers” but have zero interest in how to build stuff from scratch let alone having more stuff in their garages

    So, I take it you’ve asked them personally? Because it’s kind of an odd question to bring up in casual conversation…

    “Hey, you know what you should do? Learn how to run a mill and a lathe and then go buy one.”

    My slightly snarky point is that a) you don’t know what people might want to do until you bring up the subject and b) you’re making a blanket assumption about everyone based on what you think 6 people you happen to know might want to do or have an interest in.

    Even if 1 in 50 shows an interest and starts learning, that’s that many more people we can count amongst the ranks of people we have helped, people we can rely on – or they can rely on themselves and become more valued members of their communities…

    Writing everyone off because you’re making assumptions about 6 people is… not something I would do.

    How do I know? I’ve talked with my neighbors and helped with a couple of builds for several.

    See above.

    Just like auto mechanics, same people may have the tools and even the knowledge but still take their car to a mechanic for anything but the basics

    I’m not going to make any assumptions about people I don’t know – but I can tell you that I had what might be an unusually high percentage of friends growing up who spent their time building things like engines, etc. It might just be a case of like with like, but everyone that I know wants to know how stuff works so they can do it themselves…

    Not everyone has the inclination or desire to hack their own out especially when they still have to make a life for themselves today.

    Granted.

    But there will come a day when they might have a serious need for “hacking their own out”, and they won’t be able to do it. And thinking you (or me, or anyone like us) will be there to pick up the slack is short-sighted. Not saying “make everyone a ‘smithy with my (or your) skill set” – I’m saying knowledge is weightless and learning how to do something can only add to your skill set and is hardly detrimental. Like knowing how to build a Swedish Torch – I might never have a need for that. Ever. For the rest of my life. But I know how to build one.

    I’m done.

    Same.

    Enjoy your Christmas.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

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