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  • #48252
    Profile photo of L Tecolote
    L Tecolote
    Survivalist
    member8

    I fell heir to several rusty tools, including a 6″ Crescent wrench that was rusted completely inoperable — couldn’t even budge the adjusting screw. After a couple of days soaking in WD-40,and a lot of tapping and cussing, the adjusting screw still wouldn’t turn and the jaw wouldn’t move. On a lucky trip to a used tool store, I discovered Gibbs Lubricant with the claim that among other wonders, it was “designed to lubricate, stop, REVERSE and eliminate all types of corrosion.” I took the chance and bought a can.

    A couple of days after applying Gibbs, I was able to turn the adjusting screw a little, and move the jaw by tapping it. It took a little work, but the tool is fully functional, now. Nobody on this forum would let tools or firearms rust, but sometimes tools that have rusted sticky or shut can be purchased for next to nothing, and restored to use.

    Another product I first saw at a gun show is MxBon 105, the best cyanoacrylate glue I’ve ever seen. The guy selling it had a neat sales trick. He produced a roll of black rubber tubing (about 1/4″ OD, 1/8″ ID) He snipped off about 10″ of it, invited me to pull it against him to satisfy myself of its strength. He then cut it in two, applied a drop of the glue, butted the ends together, and immediately, asked me to pull again. It held against all we could tug. On the strength of that demo, I bought some. About a couple of months later, I was riding my bike home in the dark through an industrial area, ran over something that cut my (nearly new) front tire across the tread, about 3/4″ long.

    After some bad language, a long walk, and two bus rides, I got the bike home, removed the tire, patched the tube, and applied the MxBon glue to the cut in the tire, cords and all, and pushed it together. I had to trim and sand a little excess glue on the inside of the tire, so it wouldn’t abrade the tube patch, but when I reassembled and re-inflated, it held 80 psi. It has now been in continuous, if sporadic, service for about 3 years. Not too bad.

    I’d like to hear of any other “miracle” products.

    Cry, "Treason!"

    • This topic was modified 2 years, 6 months ago by Profile photo of L Tecolote L Tecolote.
    #48266
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Saved off in my files of “Stuff to try”. Good find. Thanks.

    By the way, Oil of Wintergreen is an old-school rustbreaker and loosener… at 100% concentrate, it will kill you dead if you drink it. At 1 part per million, it flavors gum.

    The synthetic version – Methyl Salicylate – is used as a topical to relieve muscle aches. Mixed with 10% rubbing alcohol, it will soften rubber products.

    Screw or bolt rusted beyond all hope?

    Take a bottle of Oil of Wintergreen and put one drop on the head of the screw. Over a period of time – maybe 18 to 24 hours – it will work down into the threads. Take your screwdriver and put it in the screw, but don’t turn it. Take a mallet or plastic hammer and give the screwdriver end a good thump. That should do it. Very slowly, apply pressure and see if the screw will turn… reapply and repeat as necessary…

    Can be found from Amazon to Walgreens… I’d give the synthetic version a whirl for breaking loose rusty stuff. It’s cheaper than the organic stuff.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 6 months ago by Malgus Malgus.
    #48269
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    Thanks for the info. Gotta find some.

    Personally, I have never found anything better than Amsoil’s “MP” (Metal Protector) instead of WD-40. It protects metal better than almost anything I’ve found, after it dries, and has allowed me to break loose rusted nuts and bolts over the years far better than WD-40 (which leaves residue). My father-in-law, who was extremely protective of his guns, had his own favorite brands of lubes, etc., that he’d used “forever,” and would not consider changing them. He did take a can of MP from me for some other “safer” application (as he saw it), was amazed, and eventually tried it on a gun he had taken in trade that wasn’t worth all that much, and not of any sentimental value to him. Over the next several years before he passed away, MP became the only product he’d use on his guns for lube and protection, and was frequently the only cleaner he’d use as well. Of course he used it on all his tools for rust protection, lube, etc. It’s sold in spray cans about the size of WD-40, and an increasing number of retail outlets now carry it, in addition to independent dealers.

    #48272
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Thanks Malgus. I prefer a mapp gas torch. Sometimes I use it with wd40. There are bolts so badly rusted they never come off. The point of wd40 is not to break them off in the hole and give yourself an even bigger problem. You have to have the touch and feel if they’re going sheer off or just come out really squeaky hard. I always prefer grade 8 bolts. Of course there are some things it’s easier to cut off with an air grinder. No point in trying to save them. Hard to tell with guns but I’ve seen some heavily rusted barrels that were firing corrosive ammo. Maybe the MP would clean them out. I’m not up to carrying out that experiment though. Rennovating really old guns would be cool. Or dangerous as the case may be.

    #48274
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    Brulen,

    MP is great at doing what WD-40 does, only better. However, it will not remove rust. It does an outstanding job of preventing it. Many years ago I found a fully rusted wrench somewhere. It was in my very early days after being introduced to Amsoil, so I was still experimenting with it (like putting a quart of 80W-90 gear lube in the freezer at 0°F to see what happened in spite of the claims – it did what it said – I could rock the bottle back and forth and the air bubble would slowly but easily move from one end to the other). So, I brought the wrench home, took some steel wool to it, and shined it up as best I could. I then got a tall jar and made as concentrated a salt water solution as I could, sprayed WD-40 on one half of the wrench, and MP on the other half. I left it out in the garage and forgot about it for a few weeks. When I found it again, I was amazed. The WD-40 end had some rusty spots forming, though it was not entirely rusted either. However, the MP end was entirely rust free. I was truly impressed. Still, over the years, I have no information (or experience) that tells me it will remove rust. It’s “merely” an outstanding synthetic spray lube, with even better protective properties.

    And it penetrates its way through heavy rust to allow removal of nuts and bolts better than anything I’ve used. The blade of our lawnmower needed sharpening before use this season, but I simply could not break the bolt loose about a week ago, even after using MP on it for several minutes. I sprayed a little more, and just left it for 24 hours. The next day the first few taps with the wrench produced movement, and after 3 turns or so, I was able to finish getting it out with just my fingers. Upon removal, there had clearly been rust all the way up the threads to the end of the bolt, but it was also clearly lubricated all the way up as well, despite having only been able to apply the lube from the outside of a “frozen” bolt. After decades of use of MP, I was not really surprised, but still very thankful.

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