Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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  • #9892
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    SHOTGUN

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #9915
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    http://www.popsci.com/article/technology/how-simple-new-invention-seals-gunshot-wound-15-seconds#xFYc5M1jZeu1KzZz.03

    you can make a similar item need surgical sponges and chitosan. a lot more comfortable for the person getting worked on than getting stuffed with gauze. ALWAYS ALWAYS do two things use the victims battle dressing not yours, before starting any work remove any weapons from reach of the patient, stuffing deep wounds with gauze to stop bleeding is extremely uncomfortable, let alone if it does not stop the hemorrhaging and you need to remove and repack it

    If making your own make sure each has EXACTLY same amount of sponges so you can count out when sewing up so no need to go back in for a septic nightmare of a sponge.

    #9924
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    Good posts. Practical advice. Thanks for sharing.

    #9930
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Good post Husky, do not forget goggles when you deal with wounds.

    #9966
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Thank you, Husky. This could be a lifesaving post. We were just discussing our medical kit with a nurse today, and going over the contents.

    #13398
    Profile photo of Dutchie
    Dutchie
    Survivalist
    member2

    Tampons. Plugs holes that were not there before. Has lots of other uses as well. Beside the obvious…

    #14398
    Profile photo of Ghost Prime
    Ghost Prime
    Survivalist
    member6

    Anyone here used Celox in deployment? I was part of a research team 12 years ago that tested Quik Clot which was later deployed by the Marines. It worked but had some fairly serious side effects, one being full tissue necrosis as the material heated up dramatically in the presence of liquid. As an example, I took a small styrofoam cup, put a little QC in it then added a little water. The exothermic reaction was enough to melt the styrofoam!  That is why I ask about Celox as I have not tested nor used it.

    For God, Family, Country, & Liberty!

    #14430
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Also important to mention here, because this info is supposed to be for treating the gunshot wound in SHTF, and that means dangerous environment that your first and most important thing is your own safety.

    You can have state of the art equipment, but in real life gunshots and fighting, because danger to get shot, your task is usually be to plug the hole, stop the bleeding and move to safety.
    Later you gonna pay attention to irrigation,sutures and whatever.. Sometimes you gonna be forced to move the victim first while he bleeding severely, and treat him when get to safety.

    But do not make mistake of getting yourself too busy in looking to the wound while bullets flying, otherwise you may end up dead.

    In real life SHTF too many folks died because “blind” wish to help other folks.

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