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  • #15016
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    I like this vm. But…what is meant by ‘sugar cookie’ precisely?

    ‘Admiral William McRaven, whose 36-year career as a Navy SEAL has been shrouded in secrecy, recently made a rare appearance in public to deliver the commencement address at the University of Texas and revealed his 10 life lessons he learned from his basic SEAL training.

    McRaven commanded a squadron in the Naval Special Warfare Development Group, better known as SEAL Team Six, and he was in charge of the planning and execution of the raid that killed Osama bin Laden, according to the Navy Times.

    Lesson No. 1: If you want to change the world, start off by making your bed.

    “If you make your bed every morning you will have accomplished the first task of the day,” said, noting that he had to have a perfectly made bed as a SEAL.

    Lesson No. 2: If you want to change the world, find someone to help you paddle.

    “You can’t change the world alone — you will need some help — and to truly get from your starting point to your destination takes friends, colleagues, the good will of strangers and a strong coxswain to guide them.

    Lesson No. 3: If you want to change the world, measure a person by the size of their heart, not the size of their flippers.

    “SEAL training was a great equalizer. Nothing mattered but your will to succeed. Not your color, not your ethnic background, not your education and not your social status.”

    Lesson No. 4: If you want to change the world get over being a sugar cookie and keep moving forward.

    “Sometimes no matter how well you prepare or how well you perform you still end up as a sugar cookie. It’s just the way life is sometimes.”

    Lesson No. 5: “If you want to change the world, don’t be afraid of the circuses.

    The circus was a form of SEAL punishment for failing to meet physical standards during training. It consisted of two hours of extra calisthenics.

    “The pain of the circuses built inner strength – built physical resiliency,” said McRaven, “Life is filled with circuses. You will fail. You will likely fail often. It will be painful. It will be discouraging. At times it will test you to your very core.”

    Lesson No. 6: If you want to change the world sometimes you have to slide down the obstacle head first.

    McRaven said that a SEAL student broke an obstacle course record when he became the first person to take it on head-first. “It was a dangerous move — seemingly foolish, and fraught with risk. It only took him half (the) time.”

    Lesson No. 7: If you want to change the world, don’t back down from the sharks.

    “There are a lot of sharks in the world. If you hope to complete the swim you will have to deal with them.”

    Lesson No. 8: If you want to change the world, you must be your very best in the darkest moment.

    “Every SEAL knows that under the keel, at the darkest moment of the mission — is the time when you must be calm, composed — when all your tactical skills, your physical power and all your inner strength must be brought to bear.”

    Lesson No. 9: If you want to change the world, start singing when you’re up to your neck in mud.

    During Hell Week in the SEALs, students spend hours neck deep in bone-chilling cold mud. But one student started singing and then they all sang along, helping them get through the ordeal.

    Lesson No. 10: If you want to change the world don’t ever, ever ring the bell.

    This lesson refers to the brass bell in the center of training camp. If a student rings the bell, he can leave the SEALs.

    McRaven said, “Ring the bell and you no longer have to do the runs, the obstacle course, and you no longer have to endure the hardships of training. Just ring the bell.” In other words, don’t ever quit.’ fm Newsmax

    What are your 10 top life lessons?

    #15078
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Tweva,

    The cookie is easily broken, gets eaten, and is sweet. Pretty much the opposite of a seal.

    #15079
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Oh thank you! I thought I got the idea, but some things if not obvious and direct like Iam fly right over the brain cells.

    #15080
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I know how it is.

    #34963
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Take Control Over Your Life
    Think & FEEL The Exceptional Results You Want To Achieve. Happiness and Success In Life starts with your state of mind. As odd as it may sound to some people, our outer world of circumstances shapes itself through our inner world of thought. YOU actually hold the key to your own happiness by exercising your power to choose your own thoughts and feelings. Whatever attitude and state of mind you project forth from yourself, you will receive back. If you maintain a favorable state of mind, you will get favorable results in life. The same with food.

    You read everywhere that a healthy diet is important for your well being. From a self development point of view, did you realise that certain foods are good for your brain as they can affect your mental performance?
    As you get older your brain ages in that you are more likely to experience cognitive problems and brain dysfunction. It is believed that unlike genetic factors that cannot be controlled, you can help to keep your brain in tip top condition by what you eat.
    You probably already know what foods make you feel sluggish and which seem to give your brain an energy boost. Several studies have now been done on the effect of food on the power of your mind. Here are some ‘brain foods’ that have been investigated:
    AVOCADOS
    High in magnesium, they produce better blood flow to the brain and help your processing.
    BEEF
    High levels of zinc. Minor zinc deficiencies have been shown to impair memory.
    BERRIES
    The acai berry is probably the most talked about but blueberries, blackberries and cranberries are all known for their antioxidants that assist in the preservation of brain cells. Containing flavonoids, they protect brain cells from free radicals and help you to retain data and information. They have also been found to increase learning capacity and motor skills.
    CHOCOLATE (dark)
    High in flavanols which increase blood flow and improve concentration, verbal and visual memory. It also has powerful antioxidant properties and stimulates the production of endorphins that help to improve your mood.
    EGGS
    Yolks contain choline which helps regulate the brain and nervous system by acting as a messenger between muscles and nerves. This is believed to boost cell production improving learning, memory and cognition. The selenium in organic eggs is thought to help your mood.
    GARLIC
    Has a protective antioxidant effect on the brain. It improves blood flow to your brain, making thinking easier, improves brain function and prevents long term degeneration of the brain’s frontal lobes.
    GINGER
    Is believed to improve cognitive function and may help prevent degenerative diseases of the brain. It is a natural anti-inflammatory food. The antioxidants in ground cloves, cinnamon, dried oregano and turmeric also help to protect the brain and improve cognition.
    GREEN LEAFY VEGETABLES
    High in iron. Iron-deficiency is linked to tiredness, poor mood, foggy thinking and other cognitive issues. Examples include spinach and kale, rich in protein and free-radical fighting antioxidants.
    NUTS
    Almonds, cashews and hazelnuts in particular are high in vitamin E which is essential to cognition and improves energy and mental alertness. Nuts also provide a great source of protein and hence the amino acids needed in neurotransmitter production.
    OLIVE OIL
    A ‘healthy fat’ that is believed essential for clear thinking, good memory and a balanced mood. (Avoiding fat can increase foggy thinking, mood swings, and insomnia.)
    OYSTERS
    Rich in selenium, magnesium, protein and other nutrients important for brain health. Research has shown significantly improved cognition and mood.
    POMEGRANATES
    The juice is full of antioxidants which are essential for a healthy brain.
    ROSEMARY
    This herb helps to provide protection from brain disease, strokes and neuro-degeneration. Its antioxidants fight free radicals, the toxic by-products of natural cell metabolism.
    SALMON (wild)
    Rich in Omega 3 fatty acids and has anti-inflammatory properties that aid in blood flow and enhance memory. Studies have shown more alertness, better memory, improved cognition, less depression and anxiety, and reduced risk of degenerative mental diseases.
    SPINACH
    Essential for cell growth, blood production and preventing memory loss. It contains nutrients that slow down the effects of premature aging by preventing the negative effects of oxidation on the brain.
    SUNFLOWER SEEDS
    Improve mental agility as well as your mood as they contain thiamine which enhances memory and thinking skills. Seeds generally are packed with protein, healthy fats and vitamin E which are good for general brain function. They also contain brain-boosting magnesium and stress-reducing antioxidants.
    TEA
    The antioxidant properties of green and black tea dilate blood vessels and increase blood flow to the brain. Tea has also been found to enhance your focus and mood, and to promote mental relaxation.
    TOMATOES
    The lycopene in tomatoes is a powerful antioxidant that fights disease by neutralizing free radicals, the molecules that damage or destroy brain cells. Tomatoes have been found to improve memory and brain function.
    TUNA
    A rich source of Omega 3 plus the highest level of vitamin B6 of any food. Studies have shown B6 to be directly correlated with memory, cognition and long term brain health, as well as being important for balancing mood.
    YOGURT
    Contains amino acids that encourage the production of neurotransmitters. Studies have indicated a growth of brain tissue while slowing down the aging process.
    WALNUTS
    High levels of Omega 3 which prevents the decline of cognitive and motor function, increases brain resiliency and improves cell functioning. It also balances the unstable neurotransmitters that can cause depression and other mood swings.
    IN SUMMARY
    Research suggests that certain foods can improve memory, neural integrity, focus, concentration, reaction time, alertness, etc., by keeping neural pathways in the brain healthy and high-functioning. For your own self development it is useful to be aware of this in order to keep both your body and mind in tip top condition.
    Link: http://russianspetsnaz.com/trainings/mind.html

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