#8414
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74
Survivalist
rnews

A few horse story’s. Both of my parents grew up on farms in the midwest during the 30’s and had horses. Horse were common and my moms dad used them for farming and didn’t want to switch to tractors. So in the 70’s my father desides to buy a small farm and we have a few steers, horses and chickens. Then he buys an old buggy and restores it. Buys hames and harness my neighbor had laying aroundd from wayback when. So he starts working with this horse we have. Bad tempered gelding that would charge you, bite and kick. Oddly he was okay when you were on top of him. My father starts by having the horse drag around an old car tire and a bunch of noisy stuff. Everything is going fine. One Saturday he hooks the horse to the buggy on the edge of the hay field. Well dad was going to lead the horse by the halter and get him use to the buggy. They didn’t go but 10 feet and the horse bolts, my father is hanging on to the halter for dear life jumping up tying to pull the horse’s head down. Hoppalong Cassidy couldn’t have made it look more dangerous. After about 200 yards he gets the horse to stop. Latter we have a few new horses but no buggy rides

I lived in Maine for a while and my neighbor has 2 riding horses. One he has been using for plowing his garden. The bigger stronger younger one. Well we have access to a lot where we can cut wood and we decide to use this horse to pull it out. It’s bad place for a horse, irregular ground roots and all. First problem is handling this horse because he’s young and dumb and ornery, (a lot like me & my freind only we’re sweet) To be a good pulling horse they need to move slow not like this horse. We hook it up and drag a bunch of logs out. Every time it’s like the start of a race. Horse starts out with pop, got to jog along side of the log. Well the last log we pull out is 10′ long about 12″ across. My freind has the reins and I rigg the log. He and the horse pull out before I can get away from the log. I’m trying to move back and my foot hangs up in a a root. The log shifts over to my leg and I’m certain it will be broken right then. Fortunately my leg holds up but the log skidds the full lenght across my shin. Still have the divet in my leg today.

Back in the day a lot of accidents happen around horses and cattle, so mind your p’s & q’s