#59479
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Anonymous
Survivalist

they ended up taking them all down , and removing the speed trap vans . Why ? Because they were getting SHOT UP .

I’m surprised they weren’t able to prosecute the shooters – by capturing them on video just before the camera “died.” Heck – you can’t even trek in from a distance, dressed in all black including a black balaclava. The cameras along the way from where you parked and pulled the balaclava down over your face would have tracked you, and taken a photo of your parked vehicle’s license plate.

I just read a story today that Beverly Hills, CA, is installing 600 more cameras – to prevent crime, of course.

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-beverly-hills-cameras-20180127-story.html

It gets even worse. This is from an article on the ACLU web site:

· A police officer in Washington D.C. pleaded guilty to extortion after looking up the plates of cars near a gay bar and blackmailing the car’s owners.
· The DEA contemplated using license plate readers to monitor people who were at a gun show. Since the devices can’t distinguish between those who are selling illegal guns and those who aren’t, a person’s presence at the gun show would have landed them in a DEA database.
· A SWAT team in Kansas raided a man’s house where his wife, 7-year-old daughter, and 13-year-old son lived based in part on the mass monitoring of cars parked at a gardening store. The man was held at gunpoint for two hours while cops combed through his home. The police were looking for a marijuana growing operation. They did not find that or any other evidence of criminal activity in the man’s house.

https://www.aclu.org/blog/privacy-technology/location-tracking/documents-uncover-nypds-vast-license-plate-reader-database

Finally, the background of the Chairman of the Advisory Council of a major company involved in this technology:

LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA (August 13, 2012)

Vigilant Solutions announces today that it has established an Advisory Council to support its planned development of new and innovative intelligence solutions for law enforcement. The Advisory Council will leverage the deep expertise and knowledge of its members to guide future product development efforts.

The Chairman of the Advisory Council is Mr. Howard Safir. Mr. Safir has a long and distinguished career as Police Commissioner of New York City, Director of Operations for the United States Marshals Service, Assistant Director
of the United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Fire Commissioner of New York City, member of the Executive Committee of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and Board Member of Lexis ‐ Nexis Special Solutions, Verint Systems and Implant Sciences Corporation.

The other members of the council are similarly “qualified.”