#56097
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Anonymous
Survivalist

Not so much soft as old. Circulation in lower legs and feet is an issue, and nobody can pinpoint the reason so far (it acts like diabetes, but it’s definitely not). I’d have lost all feeling in both feet by now in that environment. So, I figure I might as well take maximum advantage of the environment here in the South. I’ll enjoy the snow in photos. ;-)

I agree about the power folks. My wife’s father worked for the power company his entire life after returning from WWII, and I’ve heard the stories about the kinds of weather he had to go out in – including severe thunderstorms. He was back in the days of belts and other manual climbing equipment – no hydraulic lift trucks back in those days, at least most of his career, and he was beyond line work in his career by the time those came along. We hear so much about about first responders (deservedly so), but those folks that are out braving the elements to restore power are risking a great deal under very difficult and even dangerous conditions. I watched one guy working right outside our window where I worked before I retired, up on a pole next to a transformer for whatever reason (in a bucket, actually), and saw the bright flash around his hands. Somehow he lived and even remained conscious, but he couldn’t even manipulate the controls to get himself back down due to the shock and the serious burns on his arms. Don’t know what went wrong, but even if he was careless, it was an awful thing to watch. And we had a serious ice storm several years back that caused a large tree limb to take down the feeder line to our house. It ripped the anchor out of the fascia board, and the entire line out of the bricks, including the meter itself – it was all on the ground, and one side of the 220 was still hot. I was fortunate to get an electrician out quickly who was able to run an entirely new line up the wall and through the attic down to the breaker box, and even with all the widespread outages that day, the power company had us back up and connected before I went to bed that night. Absolutely amazing folks. Whenever there’s a hurricane in the southeast or even as far as TX, I watch the convoys of power trucks leaving our area and heading out to assist other companies. I have utmost respect and appreciation for them. I hope the ice doesn’t materialize.