#48199
Profile photo of MountainBiker
MountainBiker
Survivalist
member10

Good article as always. I have never been in a real SHTF scenario but it would seem to me that the most important thing to do is to stay calm. Easier said than done I know. Some people are much better at it than others.

Thus far in my life I have been pretty good at staying calm under adversity. My inner makeup allows me to focus in on what has to be done right then and there and then deal with the emotion afterwards. I can recount something that I would otherwise have long forgotten but didn’t on account my father was worried enough about me to to have said something to my mother who in turn told me afterwards. They were even calmer than me and so it was very unlike them. It was way back in 1985. We were living 4 hours away from my parents and it was then another 2 hours to get to my mother-in-law’s Aunt’s place. My wife and I had been looking after her as best we could in her later years. I had moved her twice in her last couple years and was slated to administer her estate after she passed. She was in the hospital for cancer surgery at age 87 and so I went down to help watch out for her. The surgery fails, there is nothing they can do for her. She has only a day, maybe two left. I head back up to my parents that night to stay over with them. In the morning I get up to head back to the hospital 2 hours away but just a couple blocks from their place some kid who had just gotten his license 3 days earlier comes roaring out of a convenience store parking lot and broadsides me so hard that he pushed my brand new car across the road sideways. If you recall the Chevy Chase movie Family Vacation, my car was the Truckster, a full sized Ford wagon which speaks to how hard he hit me that he could push me sideways that way His car was totaled, mine just about. Nobody is hurt. He lives in the neighborhood and after running around the parking lot a couple times screaming my father is going to kill me he runs home. This is a majority Italian neighborhood and so it only takes a few moments for all of the extended family females to appear and the wailing begins. The mother is in my face screaming at me why did I do this to her boy, why did I do this to her boy despite it being pretty clear from the wrecked cars what happened. An ambulance and the police arrive and then the mother is screaming at the police who won’t let the ambulance leave until they write him a ticket that her boy needs to go to the hospital. I calmly walk up to the police and say he’s not hurt, he ran around the lot a couple times and then ran home and back again before they got here. The mother then starts screaming at me again, and of course grandma, the sisters, aunts, and female cousins have all been wailing throughout all this. The ambulance leaves, I tell the police where to have my car towed tow and I’m about to walk back to my parent’s place suitcase in hand except my father happens along and he picks me up. At that point in time I knew I had to find a rental pronto and get back to the Aunt who was dying, and of course I was going to have to make the funeral arrangements, keep in line her greedy nieces who were her heirs and who would be looking for theirs before the funeral was even over, clean out her apartment, drive a rental 4 hours away from where I got it, and figure out how to get the Aunt’s car back to my place so that I could sell it on behalf of the heirs. I didn’t have time to be anything other than calm and focused and apparently I was so good at it that my father thought there was something wrong with me from the accident.

  • This reply was modified 2 years, 6 months ago by Profile photo of MountainBiker MountainBiker.
  • This reply was modified 2 years, 6 months ago by Profile photo of MountainBiker MountainBiker.