#39260
Whirlibird
Whirlibird
Survivalist
member10

First, there’s a reason why farms were small, because there’s only so much ground one can work within the growing season.

Secondly, even with enough horses and plows, the lack of hands, farriers, veterenarians leather workers and more doom it from the beginning.

lack of hands will not be an issue if everyone is starving. Farm hands will first try to work for their food.

vets are only needed for animals you intend to keep for breeding. Otherwise they are meat. Farriers exist in places. Right now it is a dying profession. I know of several younger people that would love to make a living that way but see no point since there is not enough money there. Leather working is not hard. My husband does it.

There’s hands and skilled hands, especially when we are talking about draft animals.

Farriers exist, I know two in two states. One just drove from here to northern California for a job. But like blacksmiths, they are few and far between. Not a good thing if we suddenly need them.

My father in law trained cutting horses since the early 60s, his comments about most horses aren’t fit for publication, but he has commented that if we ever needed work horses again, it would take years to breed a fraction of what is needed.

That’s where the vets come in. We are going to have to breed countless thousands of draft horses, milk and beef cows, sheep and goats and more.
Why? Because suddenly those hog farms in Iowa are not accessable to most people who aren’t local.
The dairy farms suddenly can’t get milk anywhere.
It comes to that, people everywhere are going to need critters, and without the vets, its going to take even longer.

I dare say that it will be easier to get the oil production going again faster than trying to breed enough animals for the survivors.