#37938
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sledjockey
Bushcrafter
member8

What happened to Toby’s post? I only see 74’s…..

I am a bit of a knife fiend and definitely have many thoughts on the subject. Here are the things I think about when looking for a knife:
1) What do I plan on using it for. EDC knives should be at a steeper angle (just a touch) than knives used for cutting meat and such. Those should be at a more shallow angle.
2) Hollow ground blades have their place, but not in your pocket or for heavy use. Hollow ground blades tend to break or chip in heavy use. There are exceptions, but you get the idea.
3) Type of steel is important. Depending on what you expect to do with the knife should depend on the type of steel you are looking for. Want to use it with a firesteel? Carbon steel blade is nice. Want to pry and use it for batoning wood for fire prep? Tool steel is nice for that…. Match the steel type with intended use.
4) Most production knife companies are good for EDC, but if you want something specific such as a bushcrafting knife you will most likely end up getting a custom. Don’t think that an EESE will perform the same as an Adventure Sworn custom for bushcraft use. It just isn’t so. Again…. What do you want the knife for?

You can get by with $100 for a good, solid EDC knife. I personally carry a $230 Benchmark for EDC and have several $50-$100 knives laying around my truck/home for backup. There are several backup bushcraft knives around that range at home, in packs and in my truck as well. Ironically I also have a couple $20 Morakniv Classics laying around as well for general camp uses and as a neck knife. Again, match the knife to the intended use.

Lastly, don’t expect to have 1 knife to do everything. Solid EDC drop points are horrible at certain tasks while full tang fixed blades are better for other uses. If you are looking to upgrade from China steel to better quality, don’t be scared to divide tasks among several knives and get blades for specific purposes.

http://ageofdecadence.com