#33583
Profile photo of 74
74
Survivalist
rnews

Utility companies are working on the grid to improve it, however I think most of the effort is aimed at normal weather related outages as the following document demonstrates.

http://www.eei.org/issuesandpolicy/electricreliability/mutualassistance/Documents/BeforeandAftertheStorm.pdf

Edison Electric Institute – Before and After the Storm – Update March 2014

Edison Electric Institute (“EEI”) has been asked by its members to update its January 2013 report to incorporate newly released studies on recommendations and best practices with regard to hardening the distribution infrastructure and creating a more resilient system, especially since the impact of Superstorm Sandy in the Fall of 2012.. The compilation provides a menu of infrastructure hardening and resiliency options, the relative cost impact of such measures, information on the various cost recovery mechanisms utilized, and a representative overview of various state programs addressing system hardening, resiliency and cost recovery. The compilation is aimed to serve as a reference tool to assist members in addressing state commissions and legislatures as they investigate possible regulatory reforms with respect to how electric utilities combat and respond to storm related outages.

. EEI has focused its review on potential solutions for combating and mitigating storm damage and outages – system hardening and resiliency measures. System hardening, for purposes of this report, is defined as physical changes to the utility’s infrastructure to make it less susceptible to storm damage, such as high winds, flooding, or flying debris.Hardening improves the durability and stability of transmission and distribution infrastructure allowing the system to withstand the impacts of severe weather events with minimal damage. Resiliency refers to the ability of utilities to recover quickly from damage to any of its facilities’ components or to any of the external systems on which they depend. Resiliency measures do not prevent damage; rather they enable electric facilities to continue operating despite damage and/or promote a rapid return to normal operations when damages and outages do occur.