#28566
Whirlibird
Whirlibird
Survivalist
member10

<div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>Inshala wrote:</div>Whirlibird,

“Is gun, is shoot”. LOVE IT! I read in another post, somewhere in the forums, that you are the resident firearms expert. I look forward to hearing your input on such topics.

I know exactly what you mean in regards to favorites. The first large bore rifle I recall firing was an old, lightly used German K98 Mauser WWII bring back. It was a simple weapon (except for stripping the bolt), the action was smooth, the weight was moderate, and the recoil rudely reminded me of what I was shooting. I grew up shooting 8MM Mauser and even entered junior level competition shooting using a WWII German bolt action rifle. I must admit that I was pretty good with it. I often romanticized that a sniper configuration of it would be my primary weapon should the SHTF. As I matured, I realized that it was not practical. As is, in a “peacetime” situation, finding noncorrosive 8MM Mauser ammo is difficult and EXPENSIVE!! I couldn’t imagine how difficult it would be scrounging for ammo after supplies are long exhausted. On the other hand, if I had the opportunity to use one, I think that I would be proficient in using it more so than your modern military-style weapon. So….I get your point.

As far as armories are concerned, I think most of the readers are getting “wrapped around the axle” about that suggestion. A police station armory, as well as a National Guard/Reserve weapons room, should be a vaulted chamber similar to the safety deposit box room at your local bank. It would be, by no means, an easy nut to crack. It will be; however, the source by which such supplies are distributed. As I mentioned earlier, the hardware will have to be issued out to the patrols and now more accessible than locked up in a safe. I was trying to avoid the obvious for fear of what the reaction would be, but when hell breaks loose, there will be DEAD soldiers…there will be DEAD police officers….and there will be DEAD civilians that might have the needed items on or near them. Chances are the recently deceased LE and military might have what you need. I know, it sounds ghoulish and morbid and, truth be told, I hate mentioning it….but it’s pragmatic. Example: If you come across a military police patrol that was ambushed and currently off fighting the aggressors, it might be a good time to pick over whatever hardware was left behind before they return.

Don’t know about ‘expert’ but I do make my living gunsmithing and training.

Gonna ramble a bit here.

Last first,
Dead people and their stuff.
Touchy subject, especially for LE types.
While I can understand the picking up of useful gear and making use of it, there are inherent risks.
A number of LE guns are ‘marked’ with badges, PD markings and special serial numbers. Suddenly how you came into possession of that gun/gear would be a serious question from any LEO that you’d come across later. That ‘family’ tie of those behind the badge and all.

Another threat, whoever killed those people, are they still around? Why did they leave the gear and stuff?
Are they watching and using the people/gear as bait? Boobytraps?

Next, most PD armories are either a closet or part of the evidence room. Secure? That varies heavily.

That Mauser you mention, it’s not a bad choice, it’s just one that must be well thought out beforehand.
I have a ZF-41 8mm Mauser here that I’ve dumped into a beat up sporterized stock.
Good ammo is danged expensive and rare.
But at the same time I have a couple hundred rounds of good handloaded hunting ammo in new brass, a portable reloading setup, a bullet mold and all the needed gear to sit at a fire or table and restuff the empties for a long time. I have the same setup for a number of ‘emergency’ guns.

With that Mauser, I’m better armed than many out there, as I have spent hours at the range with it, and in the field. I know where it shoots and it’s and my capabilities with it.
That couple hundred rounds equates to thousands of pounds of big game meat, possible defensive use, and uncounted small game critters.
And a 8mm bullet at 10Y will make a bad guy change his mind just like a .223 or .308.

It is certainly not ideal, not fast or flashy.
But it’s paid for and it’s here waiting.
And that beats the trick AR sitting on the shelf at work, or the local gun shop.

Some may be surprised how well you can do in an “urban rifle” class with a decent old bolt gun.
Fact is, I like to mess with my students in the larger classes and have them line up, set down their rifle and gear, then take two steps either right or left.
That way they get to use someone else’s gun/gear and experience something different.
I often put a levergun or bolt gun in the mix to mess with the shooters.

Scrounging ammo.
Tough one. There have been ‘salted’ rounds over the years left behind in various locations to mess with insurgents. I certainly would be careful depending on circumstances as to what I was picking up. Much depends on the how long and where, as to this possibility.
The Germans and Russians both left ‘bad’ ammo behind in various locations in WWII and Afghanistan.
Might someone do that again?

We can always look at “Butter Knife Guns” and cause some people a number of nightmares.
The BKG, that old deer rifle/shotgun/pistol that grandpa left behind with a handful of ammo.
It can defend you, it can provide meat, and it can be used to gain a better gun.
Once you have gotten that newly ‘dropped gun’ from above, you pass the BKG off to someone else to do the same.
Then you use your capture to gain other arms and gear.
That pistol may supply you a rifle, which may gather some grenades and a LMG.
It all depends on circumstance and your scruples.